Blog

June 25, 2018 Week #4 Preview: What's in the Basket?

fullsizeoutput_4ce8.jpeg

Thanks to those of you who emailed to tell us you enjoyed our first weekly preview! We love being able to share what we're getting ahead of time, to whet your appetite. And, we know that on occasion, due mostly to the weather, we will still have an item or two that's up in the air on Friday, so the emails may sometimes contain a TBD. 

Have you noticed that we've started adding a bit more info to our recipes? Now you can easily see if a recipe is vegan (V), vegetarian (veg), gluten-free (GF), or dairy-free (DF). We'll make sure that each week, we provide at least one recipe in each of those categories. 

We're always working to improve the resources we provide to you. Please send any feedback or suggestions you have to Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic | Meet Our Producers

Vermont Vegetable Package

  • Cherry Tomatoes* | Jericho Settlers Farm
  • Shiitake Mushrooms* | 1000 Stones Farm
  • Strawberries* | Last Resort Farm
  • Mesclun* | Pitchfork Farm
  • Zucchini/Yellow squash* | River Berry Farm/Intervale Community Farm
  • Garlic Scapes* (variety shares only) | Burnt Rock Farm/Bella Farm

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Chicken Breast | Maple Wind Farm
  • Forerunner, raw milk Havarti cheese | Mount Mansfield Creamery
  • Maple vinaigrette salad dressing* | Joe's Kitchen at Screamin' Ridge Farm

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes the Omnivore Package above, plus...

  • Ciabatta* | Red Hen Baking Company
  • Pasture Raised Eggs |  Besteyfield Farm

Recipe Plans & Dreams

  1. Bread salad (panzanella) with roasted cherry tomatoes and mushroom confit (V)
  2. Crustless quiche with scapes & havarti (Veg)
  3. Mesclun with maple vinaigrette & toasted sunflower seeds (V)
  4. Chicken & couscous with seared squash
  5. Strawberry-basil shortcake

Week of June 18, 2018

fullsizeoutput_7ca.jpeg

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic | Meet Our Producers

Vermont Vegetable Package

  • Asparagus* | Deep Root/Vallons Maraichers
  • European Cucumber* | Deep Root/L'Abri Vegetal
  • Strawberries* | Last Resort Farm
  • Lettuce* | Pitchfork Farm
  • Arugula* (starter & variety shares only) | Pitchfork Farm
  • Dill* (starter & variety shares only) | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm
  • Swiss Chard*  (value & variety shares only) | Miskell's Premium Organics

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Wild Alaskan Smoked Salmon | Starbird Fish
  • Chevre* | Does' Leap Farm
  • Yogurt, whole, plain* | Butterworks Farm

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes the Omnivore Package above, plus...

  • Mad River Grain Bread* | Red Hen Baking Company
  • Pasture Raised Eggs |  Besteyfield Farm
 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Polenta Bread*

Red Hen Baking Co.

Cheddar Cheese

Shelburne Farms

Pasture Raised Eggs

Besteyfield Farm

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

  • Strawberries! 
  • Eat those delicious berries first! And if you have a few that get a little soft before you get to 'em, make sure to check our our recipe for simple syrup. After that, use up the arugula...the tender leaves bruise easily.
  • Next, go for the asparagus, head lettuce, and dill. Not gonna use all of the dill? You can hang the bunch upside-down to dry it, make a dill infused vinegar, or even a cucumber and dill infused vodka
  • The chard and European cucumbers have the longest shelf life of the produce items. 
  • We don't have any new recipes for asparagus this week, but you can search our archive for all of our previous asparagus recipes! 
  • Check out our "Tender Profiles" to find more cooking and storage tips! 

Have cooking ideas you want to share? Looking for recipe suggestions? Email Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org

 

Recipes

The dishes below were created by Suzanne, our Cooking Education Coordinator. Each week, we aim to provide you with recipes that will get you excited to use the items in your basket. We welcome your feedback and suggestions! 

Tender Profiles

With our new summer season, we're adding some delicious extra content to our weekly newsletter, and our blog. For one thing, we'll be creating "Tender Profiles" for the fruits and veggies we're sending you in your weekly baskets. "What's 'Tender'?" you may ask... it's like a dating profile for produce! We'll give you each product's vital statistics, other foods that go well with it, and some storage and cooking tips. 

Weekly Shopping List

If you make all of the recipes that we recommend this week, you'll need these items. You may already have some of them in your cupboard and your fridge. They're organized roughly as you'd find them in a store. Quantities are rounded, when it's more sensible to do so. Some ingredients are used "to taste," so a quantity may not be listed. 

    Strawberry-Cucumber Simple Syrup

    IMG_3688.jpg

    Strawberry-Cucumber Simple Syrup

    Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Basic | Diet: V/GF

    If you have any berries that are less than perfect, you can use them in this recipe! And, once you know how to make a simple syrup, you can make it with almost anything. Change up the fruit, add spices, mix in herbs...the sky's the limit. 

    • 2 cups water
    • 2 cups organic sugar
    • 5 ripe strawberries
    • a few hunks of cucumber
    • a smidgen of salt
    1. Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan, and bring to a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid is reduced to the consistency of maple syrup. (In classic recipes, they'll say that you want the liquid to be thick enough that it coats the back of a spoon). 
    2. Remove from heat and let cool. When it's cook, strain out the strawberries and cucumber. I like to save them, and mix them into yogurt. 
    3. Use the syrup to make homemade soda, or cocktails. You can also drizzle it over ice cream.

    Arugula Salad with Strawberries & Lemon-Honey-Yogurt Dressing

    Salad Done.jpg

    Arugula Salad with Strawberries & Lemon-Honey-Yogurt Dressing

    Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Veggie Side | Diet: GF  

    You can make this salad with any dressing that you'd like. Toasted nuts or sunflower seeds would be a great addition, if you have them. 

    1. Wash and dry arugula (if it needs it, if it's already clean, I don't bother)
    2. Rinse and slice strawberries.
    3. Toss the arugula and strawberries with the dressing. 

     

    Lemon-Honey-Yogurt Salad Dressing

    butterworks-farm-whole-plain.jpg

    Lemon-Honey-Yogurt Salad Dressing

    Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment-Dressing | Diet: GF

    This simple salad dressing is great with spicy greens, such as arugula.

    • 1 cup whole milk yogurt
    • 1/2 cup olive oil
    • 3 teaspoons shallot
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
    • 2 teaspoons honey
    • a few shakes black pepper
    1. Combine all ingredients, and stir. Taste for seasoning. If it needs more salt, lemon juice, honey, black pepper, add them. 

    Swiss Chard Wraps with Spiced Rice & Black Beans

    fullsizeoutput_7c1.jpeg

    Swiss Chard Wraps with Spiced Rice and Black Beans

    Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Main Course | Diet: V/GF

    Don't have rice? You can wrap all kinds of other things up in chard leaves! Quinoa, sweet potatoes, refried beans, cheese, the list goes on. 

    1. Wrap the chard leaves around the rice and black beans, as described in the chard leaf recipe. 
    2. Combine the tahini, garlic, salt, and lemon juice, and stir to combine. Thin with water until the sauce reaches a drizzle-able consistency. Taste the sauce....does it need more salt, lemon juice, or garlic? Add 'em! 
    3. Drizzle the sauce over the wraps, and serve. 

    Blanched Chard Leaves

    fullsizeoutput_7c9.jpeg

    Blanched Chard Leaves

    Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: Summer/Fall | Type: Basic | Diet: V/GF

    This recipe is a simple technique for cooking big green leaves just enough that you can roll them around a filling, and eat them! It's a great strategy for those who are avoiding gluten.

    1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil.
    2. Wash chard leaves, and trim the stems just below the bottom of the leaves. You can save the stems for another use. 
    3. Dunk the leaves in the boiling water, and let them cook for 30 seconds. 
    4. Scoop out the leaves, and place them in a large bowl. Immediately run cold water over the leaves, to stop them from cooking. 
    5. Using the point of a sharp knife, cut out the bottom third of the stem. The cut will be in the shape of a slender v.
    6. To wrap a filling in the chard leaf, place around 1/2 cup filling in the center of the leaf. Fold up the bottom of the leaf (the place where the tough stem that you just excised used to be), and the fold in the sides. Once the sides are folded, roll the leaf the rest of the way, to the tip. Voila!  

     

    Spiced Rice with Dried Fruit

    IMG_3689.jpg

    Spiced Rice with Dried Fruit

    Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Starchy Side | Diet: V/GF

    This makes a perfectly lovely side dish on its own, but can also be used as a filling for chard or cabbage wraps, or as a base for a casserole. If you have a robust selection of spices in your cupboards, you could add anything else that you think would be complementary. 

    • 4 1/2 cups water
    • 2 cups jasmine or Basmati rice
    • 2 teaspoons salt
    • 3/4 teaspoon turmeric
    • 3/4 teaspoon coriander
    • A few grinds of black pepper
    • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
    • 1/3 cup dried currants, raisins, golden raisins, or cranberries
    1. In a medium pot, bring the water to a simmer. Stir in the rice, seasonings, garlic and dried fruit, and turn the heat to low. 
    2. Cover and let simmer until the rice is tender, about 20 minutes. Stir after 15 minutes, and add a little more water, if needed. 
    3. When the rice is done, taste it. Does it need more seasoning? You could add additional salt and pepper, stir in more garlic, or drizzle on a little vinegar or lemon juice, if you want a bit of acidity. If you eat dairy, you could add some butter, which would give it a creamy mouthfeel.

    Mad River Grain Toast with Goat Cheese Spread, Lettuce & Smoked Salmon

    fullsizeoutput_7c5.jpeg

    Mad River Grain Toast with Goat Cheese Spread, Lettuce & Smoked Salmon

    Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Snack/Appetizer | Diet: Omnivore

    This simple but elegant toast makes a great snack, but you can also pair it with a nice salad and some soup, and make it a meal! 

    1. Preheat your broiler on high.
    2. Cut the bread into slices that are as thin or as thick as you'd like.
    3. Put the bread slices on a sheet pan, and brush with a little bit of oil.
    4. Broil until slightly toasted on one side. Turn, and do the same to the other side. 
    5. When the bread is cool, spread with goat cheese. 
    6. Top with lettuce. If the leaves are bigger than the bread pieces, you can cut them down to size. 
    7. The smoked salmon from Starbird fish is not pre-sliced, so you could make it into big flakes with your fork, and place the flakes on top of your toast. If you happen to have sliced salmon, instead, just drape a slice or two over the toast. 

    Garlicky Cucumber, Dill, Lemon & Goat Cheese Spread

    fullsizeoutput_7c7.jpeg

    Garlicky Cucumber, Dill, Lemon & Goat Cheese Spread

    Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment | Diet: Veg/GF

    This goat cheese spread is infinitely malleable. In place of the lemon zest, cucumber, dill and garlic that are used in this recipe, you could substitute any allium (chive, red onion, scallion), any herb (parsley, cilantro, thyme, mint), and a wide variety of spices (paprika, cumin, coriander, etc.). 

    Its uses are as broad as the ingredients you can throw into the mix. It can be tossed with hot pasta as a light, creamy sauce. It's great as a sandwich spread. You can dollop it onto a salad as a garnish. Use it to top an omelette or frittata. Or simply use it as a spread on raw or roasted veggies. 

    • 1 tub goat cheese
    • a couple glugs of olive or sunflower oil
    • 1/8 cup diced cucumber (you want the cubes to be pretty small)
    • 1 tablespoon chopped dill
    • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
    • 1 teaspoon lemon zest (I like to use a microplane for this)
    • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • a few grinds or shakes of pepper
    1. Put the goat cheese in a medium-sized mixing bowl.
    2. Add a couple tablespoons of oil, to make it creamier. You could also mix in softened butter, if you prefer.
    3. Add all of the flavoring ingredients, including the cucumber cubes, dill, garlic, lemon zest and juice, and salt and pepper.
    4. Stir the goat cheese with a fork or a wooden spoon. Taste the goat cheese, and figure out if it needs anything else. If you want it to be more tangy, add more lemon juice. If it tastes a little flat, try some additional salt. Is there anything that would make it more wonderful than it is?
    5. Once you're happy with the flavor, you're ready to spread, dollop and dot it onto anything you desire. 

    Tender Profile: European Cucumber

    By Kelly Neil

    European Cucumber, a.k.a. Cucumis sativus

    Who am I?

    • Plant family: Cucurbitaceae
    • Harvest season: August through October for field cucumbers. Earlier for greenhouse cukes. 
    • Botanical details: European cucumbers are longer than slicing cucumbers, and have thinner skin and smaller seeds. In some circles, they are considered to be a superior eating cucumber. 
    • Great source of*: Vitamin K. Cucumbers are delicious, crunchy water! They do contain other vitamins and minerals, but you'd have to eat a lot of cucumber to get an appreciable amount. 

    *contains more than 10% of the recommended daily allowance for these nutrients

    How to care for me:

    • I can be stored for up to two weeks in the crisper drawer of your fridge. But, like most things, the fresher I am, the better.

    Pairings:

    • I am a great match for tangy ingredients, such as vinegar (think pickles), lemon juice, and yogurt, as well as for bold and pungent alliums, including garlic, chives, and red or green onion. Because of my mild flavor, I compliment lots of different herbs and spices. Try parsley, cilantro, caraway, coriander, cumin, horseradish, mint, and thyme. 

    How to cook me: 

    I show up a lot in Mediterranean cuisines, as well as Southeast Asian cuisines. 

    Fun Facts:

    • Cucumbers are one of the oldest cultivated vegetables. They've been grown by humans since 8000 B.C. 
    • It is believed that cucumbers originated in India. They're related to zucchini, summer squash, pumpkins, and melons. 
    • It's said that Ulysses S. Grant would make an entire meal out of cucumber and coffee.
    • The ancient Egyptians made a drink out of fermented cucumbers.
    • The longest cucumber ever recorded was grown in England, and measured 47-inches long. 
    • Because they're so high in water, the inside of a cucumber can be up to 10 degrees cooler than the ambient temperature. 

    Shopping List, Week of June 18, 2018

    IMG_2936.JPG

    If you make all of the recipes that we recommend this week, you'll need these items. You may already have some of them in your cupboard and your fridge. They're organized roughly as you'd find them in a store. Quantities are rounded, when it's more sensible to do so. Some ingredients are used "to taste," so a quantity may not be listed. 

    • Produce
      • 1/2 bulb shallot
      • 3 lemons
      • 1 head garlic
    • Bulk/Dry Goods
      • 2 teaspoons turmeric
      • 2 teaspoons coriander
      • 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast
      • 2 cups jasmine rice
      • 1 cup organic sugar
      • 1/2 cup dried currants
      • 1 cup tahini
      • 2 cups honey
      • salt
      • pepper
    • Bottled Items/Condiments
      • 1 large can black beans (or, you could cook beans from scratch, or sign up for our monthly subscription)
    • Items from our Localvore Basket or our add-on subscriptions (if you don't get those subscriptions, you should add these to your shopping list)
      • Chevre
      • Yogurt
      • Mad River Grain Bread
      • Smoked Salmon
      • Black Beans

    June 18, 2018 Week #3 Preview: What's in the Basket?

    IMG_2936.JPG

    As we dive into the summer season, we're experimenting with something new! From now on, on Fridays, we're going to send you the list of items you'll be receiving the following week. Why? So that you have more time to plan and shop over the weekend!

    Below that list, you'll find a list of dishes that our cooking team is planning to make with our basket, on Monday. Why do we cook on Monday? Because that way, we get to use the same fresh and delicious items that you'll be receiving, from the same farms!

    We'll post photos to Instagram so you can follow along while we're cooking, and on Monday afternoon or early evening, we'll send out the detailed recipes, and a shopping list.

    Please send any feedback or suggestions you have to Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org

    In Our Baskets Next Week

    *Certified Organic | Meet Our Producers

    Vermont Vegetable Package

    • Asparagus* | Deep Root/Vallons Maraichers
    • European Cucumber* | Deep Root/L'Abri Vegetal
    • Strawberries* | Last Resort Farm
    • Lettuce* | Pitchfork Farm
    • Arugula* (starter & variety shares only) | Pitchfork Farm
    • Dill* (starter & variety shares only) | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm
    • Swiss Chard*  (value & variety shares only) | Miskell's Premium Organics

    Omnivore Package

    The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

    • Wild Alaskan Smoked Salmon | Starbird Fish
    • Chevre* | Does' Leap Farm
    • Yogurt, whole, plain* | Butterworks Farm

    Localvore Package

    The Localvore Package includes the Omnivore Package above, plus...

    • Mad River Grain Bread* | Red Hen Baking Company
    • Pasture Raised Eggs |  Besteyfield Farm

    Recipe Plans & Dreams

    1. Mad River Grain toast with cucumber-dill-goat-cheese spread, smoked salmon & lettuce
    2. Chard wraps with beans, rice, currants and fragrant spices (V, GF)
    3. Tahini sauce for chard wraps (V, GF)
    4. Arugula salad with strawberries & lemon-honey-yogurt dressing (Vegetarian, GF)
    5. Grilled asparagus (V, GF)
    6. Strawberry & cucumber simple syrup (V, GF)

    Week of June 11, 2018

    IMG_3564.jpg

     

    In Our Baskets This Week

    *Certified Organic | **Pasture Raised | Meet Our Producers

    Vermont Vegetable Package

    • Shiitake Mushrooms* | Mousam Valley Mushrooms
    • Scallion* | Pitchfork Farm
    • Radish* | Pitchfork Farm
    • Gem Lettuce* (value share only) | Pitchfork Farm
    • Collards*  (value & variety shares only) | Miskell's Premium Organics
    • Mesclun* (starter and variety shares, only) | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm
    • Asparagus* (starter and variety shares, only) | Deep Root/Vallons Maraichers
    • Microgreens* (variety share only) | Pitchfork Farm

    Omnivore Package

    The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

    • Beef Stew Meat** | Maple Wind Farm/Health Hero Farm/Snug Valley Farm
    • Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery
    • Beef Broth  | Joe's Kitchen at Screamin' Ridge Farm

    Localvore Package

    The Localvore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

    • Beef Stew Meat** | Maple Wind Farm/Health Hero Farm/Snug Valley Farm
    • Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery
    • Beef Broth  | Joe's Kitchen at Screamin' Ridge Farm
    • Bread: Polenta Bread*  |  Red Hen Baking Company
    • Pasture Raised Eggs  |  Besteyfield Farm
     

    Weekly Subscriptions

    Bread: Polenta Bread*

    Red Hen Baking Co.

    Cheddar Cheese

    Shelburne Farms

    Pasture Raised Eggs

    Besteyfield Farm

     

    Monthly Subscriptions

    • Ground Beef  |  Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
    • Pasture Raised Chicken  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
    • Sausage from Pastured Pigs  |  Hot Italian & Montreal Spice  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
    • Bean Burgers* | Black Bean Burgers & Maple Chipotle Burgers  |  Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield, VT
    • Tortillas & Beans * | Soft White Corn Tortillas & Black Beans  |  All Souls Tortilleria, - Warren, VT and Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield, VT
    • Wild Alaskan Fish  |  Coho Salmon Fillets & Cod Fillets  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT
    • Wild Alaskan Salmon  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT
     

    Cooking & Storage Tips

    • Now that the weather is warming up, we're getting a wider variety of delicious food from the field. Asparagus season is almost over, though, so cherish these last bunches (the final asparagus of the season will be next week). 
    • Eat this first: microgreens...these babies have a fairly short shelf life. Spread butter or goat cheese on a piece of bread, and sprinkle on the micros. Or, put them on sandwiches, or even homemade pizza. You can also dress them lightly with a vinaigrette, and use them to garnish meat or seafood dishes (that Coho salmon we offer in the monthly subscriptions would make a great partner). After that, use up the mesclun. 
    • Next, get after the shiitake mushrooms, asparagus, gem lettuce, and scallions.
    • The radishes (with tops removed) and collards have the longest shelf life of the produce items. 
    • Check out our "Tender Profiles" to find more cooking and storage tips! 

    Have cooking ideas you want to share? Looking for recipe suggestions? Email Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org

     

    Recipes

    The dishes below were created by Suzanne, our Cooking Education Coordinator. Each week, we aim to provide you with recipes that will get you excited to use the items in your basket. We welcome your feedback and suggestions! 

    Tender Profiles

    With our new summer season, we're adding some delicious extra content to our weekly newsletter, and our blog. For one thing, we'll be creating "Tender Profiles" for the fruits and veggies we're sending you in your weekly baskets. "What's 'Tender'?" you may ask... it's like a dating profile for produce! We'll give you each product's vital statistics, other foods that go well with it, and some storage and cooking tips. 

    Weekly Shopping List

    If you make all of the recipes that we recommend this week, you'll need these items. You may already have some of them in your cupboard and your fridge. They're organized roughly as you'd find them in a store. Quantities are rounded, when it's more sensible to do so. Some ingredients are used "to taste," so a quantity may not be listed. 

      Basic Beef Stew

      IMG_3570.jpg

      Basic Beef Stew

      Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Longer (although active time is only around 15 minutes, this dish needs to cook for more than two hours) | Season: All | Type: Main Dish | Diet: Omnivore/GF/DF

      You can keep this stew simple, but you could also jazz it up with additional ingredients, such as potatoes, mushrooms, more alliums (things in the onion and garlic family), or other green vegetables. And, you can serve it over a starch, such as brown rice or barley. 

      • 1 pound beef stew meat
      • salt
      • pepper
      • olive oil
      • The whites from 1 bunch scallions (reserve the greens for other recipes, such as scallion vinaigrette)
      • 3 carrots
      • 24 ounces beef broth, or chicken broth
      • 1/2 bunch collard greens
      • lemon juice or vinegar to taste
      1. Remove stew beef from package and pat dry. You can use clean kitchen towels if you're comfortable doing that, or use paper towels. 
      2. Season the meat with salt and pepper.
      3. Heat the oil in a large heavy saucepan or pot, over medium-high heat. (Make sure the saucepan has high enough sides that it can hold all of the other ingredients, and has a cover). When the oil shimmers, add the beef. 
      4. Cook until the beef is browned on the bottom, at which point it will have released itself from the pan. Turn the beef and brown the opposite side.
      5. Meanwhile, slice the scallions into rounds.
      6. Rinse the carrots, cut off the tops and ends, and cut the carrot into half moons. 
      7. When the beef is browned on the second side, add the scallion and carrots to the pan, and cook, stirring, for 3-4 minutes.
      8. Add the broth, and cover the pan. Turn the heat down so that the liquid is simmering, but not boiling. Cover the pan and let cook for 2-3 hours, until the beef is tender.
      9. When the beef is tender, rinse the collard greens, pull out the stems, and roll up the leaves like a cigar. Slice across the collard bundle to make thin shreds.
      10. Add the collards to the stew, and cook until they're tender. 
      11. Taste the stew for seasoning. Does it need salt? Add some. How about acidity? You can use vinegar or lemon juice to make it taste brighter. 
      12. If you'd like, you could garnish the beef stew with microgreens, sour cream, grated cheese, or toasted bread cubes. 

      Roasted Radishes

      IMG_3563.jpg

      Roasted Radishes

      Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: SpringSummerFall | Type: Veggie Side Dish | Diet: Vegan/GF/DF

      If you get tired of eating them raw, radishes can also be roasted. In the oven, their bright red skin changes to a vibrant fuchsia. Serve with fatty meats, as a bit of a palate cleanser. 

      • Radishes
      • Olive oil or another oil you prefer
      • Salt
      1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
      2. Rinse the radishes, and cut off the tops (if you haven't already for storage), leaving about an inch of stem. 
      3. On a baking sheet or in a baking dish, toss the radishes with a couple tablespoons of olive oil. Sprinkle with salt.
      4. Roast until just tender, and slightly wrinkled, around 25 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.

       

      Scallion Vinaigrette

      IMG_3568.jpg

      Scallion Vinaigrette

      Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment/Dressing | Diet: Vegan/GF

      A slight variation on a basic vinaigrette, this one uses scallions on place of the usual shallots. 

      • 1/3 cup olive oil
      • 2/3 cup neutral or nutty oil (such as grapeseed or sunflower)
      • 1/3 cup white wine vinegar, cider vinegar, or another vinegar you prefer
      • 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
      • 1/3 cup scallion (the green part), chopped
      • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
      • pepper to taste
      1. If you’re using a blender, combine all of the ingredients, and purée. The mustard will act as an emulsifier, which means that it will allow the oil and vinegar to mix, and it will make the resulting dressing seem creamy, even though it isn’t.
      2. If you’re making the dressing by hand, you could combine all of the ingredients in a jar, cover it with a lid, and shake it. Or, you could combine everything except the oil in a bowl, and drizzle in the oil while whisking. (If you are making the dressing by hand, cut the scallions into smaller pieces). 
      3. When you are dressing a salad, start with less dressing than you think you’ll need, add it to the bowl with the greens, and toss gently with tongs. Taste a leaf, and add more dressing, or salt, as needed. 

       

      Raw Radishes with Compound Butter

      IMG_3576.jpg

      Raw Radishes with Compound Butter

      Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: Spring, Summer, Fall | Type: Appetizer, Snack | Diet: Veg/GF

      In France, it's common to eat raw radishes dipped in butter. If the butter is flavored, it's even more fun! 

      1. Quarter the radishes (or cut them in slices, if you'd prefer), and dip them into the butter. If the butter isn't heavily salted, you could sprinkle the radishes with a little bit of salt. 

      Compound Butter

      IMG_1494 (1).jpg

      Compound Butter

      Recipe Level: Basic | Active Time: Quick | Season: Any | Type: Basic | Diet: Veg/GF* | Labels: N/A

      Compound butter is incredibly simple to make. You just soften butter, and stir in another flavorings you like. You can serve it warm, or chill it in rolls so that you can cut it into pretty slices. 

      • Butter, softened
      • Flavorings, such as: 
        • Alliums: such as chives, garlic, shallot, or red onion; minced. You could also use roasted garlic or caramelized onions. 
        • Spices: such as smoked paprika, black pepper, 
        • Fresh herbs: such as dill, basil, parsley, sage, thyme, or tarragon; minced
        • Salt: smoked salt is excellent in compound butter

      Mix your chosen flavorings into the softened butter. You can spoon it into a crock and serve it as-is, or you can wrap it in plastic wrap, form it into a log shape, and refrigerate it. Then, once it has set, you can cut it into slices for serving. 

      Uses for compound butter: 

      • a spread for sandwiches or toast
      • a dip for fresh, crunchy vegetables
      • put it on top of a grilled or seared steak
      • rub chicken with it before you pop it in the oven to roast.
      • any other place you'd use plain butter, but think flavored butter would be better! 

      Tender Profile: Asparagus

      009.JPG

      Asparagus, a.k.a. Asparagus officinalis

      Who am I?

      • Plant family: Asparagaceae
      • Harvest season: May through June
      • Botanical details: It takes three years for asparagus to mature enough for commercial harvest. 
      • Great source of*: Vitamin K, Vitamin A, Folate, Vitamin C, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Iron, Copper, and Manganese

      *contains more than 10% of the recommended daily allowance for these nutrients

      How to care for me:

      • Like flowers! Trim the bottom 1/2-inch of my asparagus stalks, and store me upright in a jar of water, in the fridge. 

      Pairings:

      • I love butter, whether it's simply melted, mixed with lemon and herbs, or browned. I'm also a great partner for other dairy products, such as heavy cream, chèvre, and ricotta. My tender verdant qualities make me a great match for mushrooms, too. Spruce me up with a squeeze of citrus, and don't forget the freshly grated pepper!  

      How to cook me: 

      Fun Facts:

      • The earliest known depiction of asparagus was on an Egyptian frieze that was created around 3,000 B.C. 
      • Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus coined the phrase "Velocius quam asparagi coquantur," which translates as "faster than asparagus cooks." Effectively, it means, "get a move on."
      • The Romans had special fleets to transport asparagus, which they prized highly, and carried it into the Alps to freeze it for later.  
      • The "scales" at the tip of the asparagus stalk is actually the plant's leaves. 
      • In ideal conditions, an asparagus spear can grow 10-inches in one day. 
      • In Bavaria, there's an asparagus museum