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Newsletter | Week of November 5, 2018

Onions at Burnt Rock Farm. Courtesy of Burnt Rock Farm.

Onions curing for storage at Burnt Rock Farm in Huntington, VT. Burnt Rock Farm is located in the Huntington River Valley, just about 25 miles southeast of Burlington, VT. Justin Rich and his crew specialize in growing certified organic vegetable varieties that will store well for Vermont’s cold winter months.

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified
Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package

Rainbow Carrots* | River Berry Farm, Fairfax, VT

Celeriac* | Intervale Community Farm

Spigariello* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington, VT (see cooking tips below for more info!)

Yellow Onions* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Sweet Potatoes* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Variety Size Only: Red Potatoes* | Valley Dream Farm, Cambridge, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Grass-Fed Beef Stew Meat | Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Snug Valley Farm, East Hardwick, VT

Beef Broth | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery, Fayston, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Grass-Fed Beef Stew Meat | Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Snug Valley Farm, East Hardwick, VT

Beef Broth | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery, Fayston, VT

Bread: Rustic Rolls* | Red Hen Baking Co, Middlesex, VT

Pasture-Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm, Hinesburg, VT

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Rustic Rolls* | Red Hen Baking Co., Middlesex, VT

Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

Cheddar Cheese | Shelburne Farms

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Spigariello

This leafy green vegetable is an heirloom variety that’s very similar to broccoli raab or kale - it’s in the brassica (kale/broccoli/cabbage) family, but the flavor is mild and slightly sweet. Traditionally, spigariello is native to southern Italy. Trim the stems if they’re tougher than you like.

We recommend sautéing spigariello with butter and olive oil, some thinly sliced onion and/or garlic, some red pepper flakes, and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar! You can serve it as a side dish or stir into your favorite pasta.

What’s that? Celeriac - (the lumpy one!) this is probably a new vegetable for many of you! The texture is surprisingly light and less starchy than a potato or most other root vegetables, so it can add a nice light airiness to dishes. The flavor is very much like celery, so you can use it in soups and slaws, to replace celery (especially because organic celery does not grow easily in Vermont).

Just give it a good scrub and peel it with a knife or regular vegetable peeler to get the rough outer layer cleaned off. Then you can slice it, dice it, grate it, or cut it into thin matchsticks for a variety of recipes! We feature it a few ways this week
- Raw (in apple-carrot-celeriac slaw)
- Scalloped and baked with potatoes
- Roasted with carrots and sweet potatoes into “Seasonal Fries”

Tender Profile

Recipes