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Newsletter | Week of June 18, 2018

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In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic | Meet Our Producers

Vermont Vegetable Package

  • Asparagus* | Deep Root/Vallons Maraichers
  • European Cucumber* | Deep Root/L'Abri Vegetal
  • Strawberries* | Last Resort Farm
  • Lettuce* | Pitchfork Farm
  • Arugula* (starter & variety shares only) | Pitchfork Farm
  • Dill* (starter & variety shares only) | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm
  • Swiss Chard*  (value & variety shares only) | Miskell's Premium Organics

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Wild Alaskan Smoked Salmon | Starbird Fish
  • Chevre* | Does' Leap Farm
  • Yogurt, whole, plain* | Butterworks Farm

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes the Omnivore Package above, plus...

  • Mad River Grain Bread* | Red Hen Baking Company
  • Pasture Raised Eggs |  Besteyfield Farm
 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Polenta Bread*

Red Hen Baking Co.

Cheddar Cheese

Shelburne Farms

Pasture Raised Eggs

Besteyfield Farm

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

  • Strawberries! 
  • Eat those delicious berries first! And if you have a few that get a little soft before you get to 'em, make sure to check our our recipe for simple syrup. After that, use up the arugula...the tender leaves bruise easily.
  • Next, go for the asparagus, head lettuce, and dill. Not gonna use all of the dill? You can hang the bunch upside-down to dry it, make a dill infused vinegar, or even a cucumber and dill infused vodka
  • The chard and European cucumbers have the longest shelf life of the produce items. 
  • We don't have any new recipes for asparagus this week, but you can search our archive for all of our previous asparagus recipes! 
  • Check out our "Tender Profiles" to find more cooking and storage tips! 

Have cooking ideas you want to share? Looking for recipe suggestions? Email Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org

 

Recipes

The dishes below were created by Suzanne, our Cooking Education Coordinator. Each week, we aim to provide you with recipes that will get you excited to use the items in your basket. We welcome your feedback and suggestions! 

Tender Profiles

With our new summer season, we're adding some delicious extra content to our weekly newsletter, and our blog. For one thing, we'll be creating "Tender Profiles" for the fruits and veggies we're sending you in your weekly baskets. "What's 'Tender'?" you may ask... it's like a dating profile for produce! We'll give you each product's vital statistics, other foods that go well with it, and some storage and cooking tips. 

Weekly Shopping List

If you make all of the recipes that we recommend this week, you'll need these items. You may already have some of them in your cupboard and your fridge. They're organized roughly as you'd find them in a store. Quantities are rounded, when it's more sensible to do so. Some ingredients are used "to taste," so a quantity may not be listed. 

    Week of June 11, 2018

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    In Our Baskets This Week

    *Certified Organic | **Pasture Raised | Meet Our Producers

    Vermont Vegetable Package

    • Shiitake Mushrooms* | Mousam Valley Mushrooms
    • Scallion* | Pitchfork Farm
    • Radish* | Pitchfork Farm
    • Gem Lettuce* (value share only) | Pitchfork Farm
    • Collards*  (value & variety shares only) | Miskell's Premium Organics
    • Mesclun* (starter and variety shares, only) | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm
    • Asparagus* (starter and variety shares, only) | Deep Root/Vallons Maraichers
    • Microgreens* (variety share only) | Pitchfork Farm

    Omnivore Package

    The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

    • Beef Stew Meat** | Maple Wind Farm/Health Hero Farm/Snug Valley Farm
    • Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery
    • Beef Broth  | Joe's Kitchen at Screamin' Ridge Farm

    Localvore Package

    The Localvore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

    • Beef Stew Meat** | Maple Wind Farm/Health Hero Farm/Snug Valley Farm
    • Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery
    • Beef Broth  | Joe's Kitchen at Screamin' Ridge Farm
    • Bread: Polenta Bread*  |  Red Hen Baking Company
    • Pasture Raised Eggs  |  Besteyfield Farm
     

    Weekly Subscriptions

    Bread: Polenta Bread*

    Red Hen Baking Co.

    Cheddar Cheese

    Shelburne Farms

    Pasture Raised Eggs

    Besteyfield Farm

     

    Monthly Subscriptions

    • Ground Beef  |  Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
    • Pasture Raised Chicken  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
    • Sausage from Pastured Pigs  |  Hot Italian & Montreal Spice  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
    • Bean Burgers* | Black Bean Burgers & Maple Chipotle Burgers  |  Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield, VT
    • Tortillas & Beans * | Soft White Corn Tortillas & Black Beans  |  All Souls Tortilleria, - Warren, VT and Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield, VT
    • Wild Alaskan Fish  |  Coho Salmon Fillets & Cod Fillets  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT
    • Wild Alaskan Salmon  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT
     

    Cooking & Storage Tips

    • Now that the weather is warming up, we're getting a wider variety of delicious food from the field. Asparagus season is almost over, though, so cherish these last bunches (the final asparagus of the season will be next week). 
    • Eat this first: microgreens...these babies have a fairly short shelf life. Spread butter or goat cheese on a piece of bread, and sprinkle on the micros. Or, put them on sandwiches, or even homemade pizza. You can also dress them lightly with a vinaigrette, and use them to garnish meat or seafood dishes (that Coho salmon we offer in the monthly subscriptions would make a great partner). After that, use up the mesclun. 
    • Next, get after the shiitake mushrooms, asparagus, gem lettuce, and scallions.
    • The radishes (with tops removed) and collards have the longest shelf life of the produce items. 
    • Check out our "Tender Profiles" to find more cooking and storage tips! 

    Have cooking ideas you want to share? Looking for recipe suggestions? Email Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org

     

    Recipes

    The dishes below were created by Suzanne, our Cooking Education Coordinator. Each week, we aim to provide you with recipes that will get you excited to use the items in your basket. We welcome your feedback and suggestions! 

    Tender Profiles

    With our new summer season, we're adding some delicious extra content to our weekly newsletter, and our blog. For one thing, we'll be creating "Tender Profiles" for the fruits and veggies we're sending you in your weekly baskets. "What's 'Tender'?" you may ask... it's like a dating profile for produce! We'll give you each product's vital statistics, other foods that go well with it, and some storage and cooking tips. 

    Weekly Shopping List

    If you make all of the recipes that we recommend this week, you'll need these items. You may already have some of them in your cupboard and your fridge. They're organized roughly as you'd find them in a store. Quantities are rounded, when it's more sensible to do so. Some ingredients are used "to taste," so a quantity may not be listed. 

      Newsletter | Week of June 4, 2018

      Photo by Stephanie Studer

      In Our Baskets This Week

      *Certified Organic |  Meet Our Producers

      Vermont Vegetable Package

      • Asparagus* | Deep Root/Vallons Maraichers
      • American slicing cucumber* | Jericho Settler's Farm
      • Rhubarb* | The Farm Between
      • Baby Spinach* | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm
      • Green Leaf Lettuce* | Green Heron Farm
      • Salad Turnips* (variety share only) | Jericho Settlers Farm

      Omnivore Package

      The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

      • Pork breakfast sausage | Maple Wind Farm
      • Frozen Blueberries* | Adam's Berry Farm
      • Maple Syrup  | Square Deal Farm

      Localvore Package

      The Localvore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

      • Pork breakfast sausage | Maple Wind Farm
      • Frozen Blueberries* | Adam's Berry Farm
      • Maple Syrup  | Square Deal Farm
      • Bread: Cyrus Pringle*  |  Red Hen Baking Company
      • Pasture Raised Eggs  |  Besteyfield Farm
       

      Bread: Cyrus Pringle*

      Red Hen Baking Co.

      Cheddar Cheese

      Shelburne Farms

      Pasture Raised Eggs

      Besteyfield Farm

       

      Cooking & Storage Tips

      • Welcome to summer (or at least to our summer subscription!). We're really excited to cook with you this season.
      • Eat this first: spinach and lettuce - enjoy those yummy leafy greens!
      • Next, use up the slicing cucumbers and the asparagus.
      • The salad turnips and rhubarbs have the longest shelf life of the produce items. Removing the greens from the storage turnips will make them least longer, and those greens can be cooked in a little bit of butter, or mixed in with the spinach. 
      • This week, we made a rhubarb compote and put it on blueberry pancakes, but you could also bake a rhubarb crisp. If you use this recipe, simply substitute the frozen blueberries from this week's Omnivore and Localvore shares for the raspberries. 
         

      Have cooking tips you want to share? Looking for recipe suggestions? Email Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org

       

      Recipes

      The dishes below were created by Suzanne, our Cooking Education Coordinator. Each week, we aim to provide you with recipes that will get you excited to use the items in your basket. We welcome your feedback and suggestions! 

      Tender Profiles

      With our new summer season, we're adding some delicious extra content to our weekly newsletter, and our blog. For one thing, we'll be creating "Tender Profiles" for the fruits and veggies we're sending you in your weekly baskets. "What's 'Tender'?" you may ask... it's like a dating profile for produce! We'll give you each product's vital statistics, other foods that go well with it, and some storage and cooking tips. 

      Weekly Shopping List

      If you make all of the recipes that we recommend this week, you'll need these items. You may already have some of them in your cupboard and your fridge. They're organized roughly as you'd find them in a store. Quantities are rounded, when it's more sensible to do so. Some ingredients are used "to taste," so a quantity may not be listed. 

        Sautéed Asparagus & Bok Choi

        asparagus and bok choi intervale food hub

        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: Spring | Type: Side - Veggie | Diet: Vegan/GF/DF

        • 3-4 stems asparagus
        • 1 -2 heads of bok choi
        • 2-3 tbsp coconut oil (I use this to add flavor, but you can use your cooking oil of choice)
        • salt and pepper
        • optional tamari sauce
        1. Rinse the asparagus and cut off any woody bits at the bottom. Slice them in half the long way, then cut into approximately 2 inch lengths
        2. Cut the base off of the bok choi. Rise the leaves. Slice each leaf in half so that you separate the green top from the white bottom part of the leaf. Slice the white pieces into thin strips and set aside. Then, chop the green leafy tops, and set aside. 
        3. Heat the coconut oil over medium heat in a medium-sized saucepan for a couple of minutes. Add the asparagus pieces and the white bottom pieces of the bok choi with a sprinkle of salt and pepper. 
        4. Cook until they are just becoming tender, stirring occasionally, about 5 - 7 minutes. These pieces need more cooking time than the leafy greens, which you'll add next.
        5. Test a piece - when the bok choi and asparagus are just a little bit less tender than you like them, add the leafy green tops in to the pan. Stir well, and cover for about 2 minutes. 
        6. Remove from heat and serve - season to taste with salt and pepper and tamari.

        Recipe & Photo by Kendall Frost

        Newsletter | Week of May 28, 2018

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        In Our Baskets This Week

        *Certified Organic |  Meet Our Producers

        Vermont Vegetable Package

        • Golden Potatoes* | Deep Root/Samson Farm
        • American slicing cucumber* | Jericho Settler's Farm
        • Asparagus* | Deep Root/Vallons Mariachers 
        • Bok Choy* | Miskell's Premium Organics 
        • Baby Spinach* | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm 
        • Regular Size Only: Scallions* | Miskell's Premium Organics 

        Omnivore Package

        The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

        • Chicken Drumsticks |  Maple Wind Farm
        • Plain Yogurt* | Butterworks Farm
        • Chicken Broth  | Joe's Kitchen at Screamin' Ridge Farm

        Localvore Package

        The Localvore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

        • Chicken Drumsticks |  Maple Wind Farm
        • Plain Yogurt* | Butterworks Farm
        • Chicken Broth  | Joe's Kitchen at Screamin' Ridge Farm
        • Bread: Seeded Baguette*  |  Red Hen Baking Company
        • Pasture Raised Eggs  |  Besteyfield Farm
         

        Bread: Seeded Baguette*

        Red Hen Baking Co.

        Cheddar Cheese

        Shelburne Farms

        Pasture Raised Eggs

        Besteyfield Farm

         

        Cooking & Storage Tips

        • This week we made soup with our asparagus, but it's amazing simply cut up and sautéed in a little butter or olive oil. Heat the fat until it sizzles, add the asparagus, and season with salt and pepper. When it's done, squeeze on some lemon. One tip...throw the biggest pieces from the bottom of the stalk into the pan first, and after 30 seconds or so, add the medium sized pieces, and after another 30 seconds, add the asparagus tips. That way, the pieces will finish cooking at around the same time! 
        • Nothing in this week's basket is super perishable, but the spinach is probably the first thing you should use up. It's great as a salad, or you can wilt it and serve it alongside those chicken drumsticks (if you get the Omnivore or Localvore package). 
        • It feels so summer-y to have crisp, refreshing cucumbers in the fridge. When I want a super easy, but filling snack, I make seasoned goat cheese and dip veggies into that. 
        • Got cooking tips you want to share? Or do you need help with a specific item in your share? Email Suzanne at cooking@intervale.org
         

        Recipes

        The dishes below were created by Suzanne, our Cooking Education Coordinator. Each week, we aim to provide you with recipes that will get you excited to use the items in your basket. We welcome your feedback and suggestions! Have a cooking question? Click here to send it to Suzanne, and she'll answer you within two business days. 

        Easy Asparagus Soup

        Asparagus Soup

        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: Spring | Type: Soup - Hot | Diet: Vegetarian/GF

        If you have some chicken or veggie stock kicking around the house, you can make this quick, easy, and elegant soup in no time! 

        • 1 bunch asparagus
        • 1 tablespoon butter
        • salt and pepper
        • 12 ounces chicken or veggie stock
        • white wine vinegar, to taste
        1. Rinse the asparagus and cut off any woody bits at the bottom. 
        2. Cut the asparagus into segments, setting the tips aside.
        3. Heat the butter in a medium-sized saucepan, when it sizzles, add the asparagus pieces, minus the tips. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
        4. Cook until bright green.
        5. Add the stock, and simmer until tender.
        6. Purée in a blender or food processor, or in the pot using an immersion blender. 
        7. Taste the soup for seasoning, and add vinegar, salt, and pepper to taste. 
        8. If you wish, you can sauté the asparagus tips and use them as garnish. You can also add a bit if heavy cream, if you'd like. 

         

         

        Baked Mashed Potatoes

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        Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Starchy Side | Diet: Vegetarian

        I know, I know...it's not the most beautiful picture. But, I promise that these baked mashed potatoes are totally delicious! Baking them makes a little bit of a brown, crispy crust on top, which adds a pleasing texture. This is a quick and easy version of a dish called "Duchess Potatoes," which involves piping the mashed potatoes into cute little piles and baking them. If you want to see the fancy version, click here. The truth is, I was going to put them in a pastry bag and pipe them, but then I realized I'd have to peel 'em, and I wanted to keep the skin on. 

        • 6 golden potatoes
        • salt
        • 1 stick butter
        • 4 oz. cheddar cheese, grated
        • more salt and some pepper
        • a smidgen of ground nutmeg, if you'd like
        • 6 egg yolks, whisked
        1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, rinse the potatoes and cut them into eighths. 
        2. Boil the potatoes until tender. Drain and return to the pot. At this point, preheat the broiler on high. 
        3. Add butter, cheese, salt and pepper, and nutmeg (if desired). Mash the potatoes. If you don't have a potato masher, you can use a whisk. That's one of my favorite chef tricks. 
        4. Thoroughly mix in the yolks.
        5. Butter a 9x13 glass baking dish, add the potatoes, and smooth them out. 
        6. Broil until the top is dotted with brown. Serve. 

        Seasoned & Baked Chicken Drumsticks

        Chicken Drumsticks

        Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Main Dish | Diet: Omnivore

        Crisp, juicy and quick, chicken drumsticks make a perfect weeknight meal. This recipe, which is a riff on Shake 'n' Bake, calls for coating the chicken with a mixture of flour and seasonings. You can use any herb or spice blend you enjoy, from curry powder to a barbecue rub to Middle Eastern za'atar. I noticed when making these that in the package of four drumsticks, two were larger, and two were smaller. If you want to be super precise, you could stop cooking the smaller ones a bit earlier than the bigger ones. If not, it's not big deal if you cook them all for the same length of time...the small ones might just be a little bit less juicy. 

        • 1 package chicken drumsticks
        • 1/4 cup flour
        • 2 teaspoons spice blend of your choice 
        • salt (perhaps)
        1. Preheat the oven to 425-degrees. 
        2. Remove the drumsticks from their package, and place on a large plate, or in a dish with sides.
        3. In a plastic bag, shake the flour and spices. If the spice blend includes salt, you may not want to add any. If the spice blend doesn't include salt, and 1/2 teaspoon to the dry mix. 
        4. Pour about half of the flour mixture over the chicken pieces, and turn them every which way to coat. If you need more, pour on a little more. You want them to be fully covered with flour (this is called "dredging"). 
        5. When the drumsticks are coated, put them on a baking sheet or in a 9 x 9 glass baking dish. If you'd like, you can put parchment underneath them so they won't stick, or grease the pan a bit. 
        6. Bake for 15 minutes, turn the chicken pieces, and bake another 10 minutes. When you remove them from the oven, the internal temperature should be around 165. 

        Cucumber & Radish Salad with Yogurt Dressing

        Cucumber & Radish Salad

        Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: Spring | Type: Salad, Veggie Side  | Diet: Vegetarian/GF

        This crisp, refreshing salad is a perfect accompaniment to grilled meats. Don't have radishes? That's ok, leave 'em out. Have some crispy head lettuce kicking around, or a tomato? Throw 'em in! 

        • 1 slicing cucumber
        • 1 bunch radishes
        • 1 bulb shallot (most shallots start out with two bulbs)
        • 3/4 cup plain, whole-milk yogurt
        • 1 tablespoon walnut oil or olive oil
        • 1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
        • 1/2 teaspoon dried dill (or 1 teaspoon fresh dill)
        • salt and pepper to taste
        1. Cut the cucumbers in half lengthwise, and slice into half moons.
        2. Cut the radishes in half, and cut each half into slices. 
        3. Mince the shallot
        4. In a medium-sized bowl, toss the cucumbers, radishes, and shallot with the remaining ingredients.
        5. Let stand for a few minutes so the dill can begin to rehydrate. 
        6. Taste the salad. Does it need more salt, pepper, acidity, or fat? If so, adjust the seasonings. 

        Newsletter | Week of May 21, 2018

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        In Our Baskets This Week

        *Certified Organic |  Meet Our Producers

        Vermont Vegetable Package

        • Russet potatoes* | Deep Root/Samson Farm
        • American slicing cucumber* | Jericho Settler's Farm
        • Rhubarb* | The Farm Between 
        • Radish | Queen City Acres/Pitchfork Farm 
        • Mesclun* | Diggers' Mirth Collective Farm 
        • Regular Size Only: Collard Greens* | Miskell's Premium Organics 

        Omnivore Package

        The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

        • Wild Alaskan smoked salmon |  Starbird Fish
        • Chevre* | Does' Leap Farm
        • Frozen raspberries*  | Adam's Berry Farm

        Localvore Package

        The Localvore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

        • Wild Alaskan smoked salmon |  Starbird Fish
        • Chevre* | Does' Leap Farm
        • Frozen raspberries*  | Adam's Berry Farm
        • Bread: Ciabatta*  |  Red Hen Baking Company
        • Pasture Raised Eggs  |  Besteyfield Farm
         

        Bread: Ciabatta*

        Red Hen Baking Co.

        Cheddar Cheese

        Shelburne Farms

        Pasture Raised Eggs

        Besteyfield Farm

         

        Cooking & Storage Tips

        • Rhubarb is a sure sign of spring! It's actually a perennial vegetable, and its colorful stalks are super tart. If you don't have frozen or fresh berries, try making this rhubarb compote (recipe by Martha Stewart), which you can freeze, or serve over yogurt, ice cream or pancakes!
        • It's exciting to see the first spring radishes in this week's share. I like to serve them raw with butter and salt, but I also love to toss them with a little olive oil and salt, and roast them.
        • Also, there are some baby radish greens atop the radishes...you can eat those, too! They're a bit spicy, and I like them best wilted with other greens, but you can chop them and throw them into a salad, too. 
        • Slicing cucumbers make a great snack as well. Slice into rounds, or into sticks, and sprinkle with a little salt. 
        • As usual, the mesclun is the most perishable item you're receiving, so serve up some salads early in the week.
        • Collard greens are in the cabbage, broccoli, and kale family! These will be relatively tender, since they come from a greenhouse, so they're best lightly sauteed, or wilted as in our recipe below!
         

        Recipes

        The dishes below were created by Suzanne, our Cooking Education Coordinator. Each week, we aim to provide you with recipes that will get you excited to use the items in your basket. We welcome your feedback and suggestions! Have a cooking question? Click here to send it to Suzanne, and she'll answer you within two business days. 

        Potato Pancakes with Smoked Salmon and a Toppings Bar

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        These loaded potato pancakes make an incredible Sunday brunch. Make all of the toppings, whip up some potato pancakes, and let each person decide how they want to dress theirs up.

        1. Make some potato pancakes
        2. Top 'em with smoked salmon
        3. Add whatever toppings make you happy! Try different combos! 

        Spiced Yogurt with Cucumber & Garlic

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        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment | Diet: Vegetarian/GF

        This is a riff on Greek tzatziki, which has some things in common with Indian raita. It's a combination of yogurt and cucumber, with some spices mixed in. As with many of our recipes, it's very flexible, and you can change it to suit your palate, and your mood. This is a very basic, rustic version of the recipe, but if you'd like, you could make it a little more elegant by starting with strained yogurt, or by salting the cucumber, letting them sit for a while, and squeezing them out a bit before adding them to the yogurt.

        I use this as a topping for potato pancakes, as a cooling ingredient on spicy meat or bean dishes, or eaten alone, as a snack. 

        • 1/2 of a slicing cucumber
        • 2 cups yogurt, or strained yogurt
        • 1 tablespoon olive or walnut oil
        • Herbs and spices to taste: I used dill, smoked paprika, salt, and pepper. Cayenne would be a great addition if you like heat. Ground caraway seed would be excellent, too. 
        1. Rinse the cucumber, and grate it on the largest side of a box grater. 
        2. Mix the cucumber and yogurt. 
        3. Add oil and season to taste. 

        Goat Cheese with Scallion & Lemon

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        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment | Diet: Vegetarian/GF

        This delicious concoction has many uses. Toss it with hot, fresh pasta and it will turn into a light, creamy sauce. Spread it on sandwiches, or slices of toast. Use it to stuff ravioli. Put it on an omelette, or on a salad. Eat it with a spoon. 

        • 8 ounces chevre
        • a glug of olive oil, or walnut oil
        • The zest and juice of 1/2 lemon
        • 2 scallions (I actually used the leaves of wild leeks when I made this. You could also use shallot, chives, or garlic, in place of the scallion).
        • salt and pepper to taste
        1. Dump the chevre into a bowl. 
        2. Add some oil, I use about a tablespoon, and the lemon zest and juice
        3. Rinse the scallions and slice the green leaves into little rounds, reserving the white bulbs for another use (or throw it all in...it will be great either way). If you're using another allium, such as garlic or shallot, mince it before adding.
        4. Add some salt and pepper, and stir it all up. 
        5. Taste the concoction. Would you like it to be more tangy? If so, add more lemon juice, or a splash of vinegar. Does it need salt or pepper? Add some more. You could even get really wild and mix in some hot sauce, or kimchi brine, or anything else you desire. 

        Wilted Collards

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        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: Spring/Summer | Type: Veggie Side | Diet: Vegan/Vegetarian/GF/DF

        This technique can be used for pretty much any green: think mustard, kale, chard, spinach, etc. I like to make batches of wilted greens, and put them on omelettes, add them to soup, or freeze them for later. They can become one of the layers in a cottage pie. I also eat them as a simple side dish.  

        • 1 pound collard greens
        • 1 tablespoon butter or olive oil
        • salt and pepper
        • lemon juice or vinegar
        1. Wash the collards and strip them from their stems. Cut them stems into pieces.
        2. Roll up the leaves in one big bunch, and cut across the bundle to form strips (the fancy French term for this is "chiffonade.")
        3. With the burner on medium, heat the butter or oil in a large, heavy bottomed saucepan. 
        4. When the fat is hot, add the stems and a sprinkling of salt, and cook until tender.
        5. Then, add the leaves, and continue cooking until the leaves have turned an even, deep green, and are also tender. 
        6. Taste, add salt and pepper as needed, and finish with a squeeze of lemon juice.
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        Rhubarb-Berry Crisp

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        Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: Spring | Type: Dessert | Diet: Vegetarian

        Tart and tangy rhubarb is one of the harbingers of spring. Rhubarb and strawberry is a classic combination, but rhubarb also goes extremely well with raspberries, apples, cherries, and pear. If you don't have much time, chop your rhubarb, put it in a pan with water and some sugar, and cook it into a sauce. If you do have time, make a crisp...

        • 1 pound rhubarb
        • 5 ounces or more frozen raspberries, or any other berry or fruit of your choice
        • 1/2 cup maple syrup, or 1/2 cup sugar (you may want to add more, to taste)
        • 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon (cardamom, ginger, and pepper also go well with rhubarb. Add them if you wish!)
        • 2 teaspoons vanilla
        • 1 teaspoon organic cornstarch (optional, this is used to thicken the liquid from the fruit)
        • 2 cups rolled oats
        • 1/2 stick butter, softened
        • 1/4 cup sugar
        • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
        • 1/2 teaspoon salt
        1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees, and butter a 9x13 glass baking dish. 
        2. Rinse the rhubarb, cut the stalks in half to shorten them, and cut each half into quarters, lengthwise. Make 1/4-inch slices across the quarters. In your baking dish, combine the rhubarb slices with whole berries, or chopped apples or pears. 
        3. Add maple syrup or sugar to the fruit, as well as the spices, vanilla, and cornstarch, if you're using it. Stir well with your (clean!) hands, or with a spoon or spatula, until all items are evenly distributed. 
        4. In a bowl, combine the oats, butter, sugar, cinnamon and salt. Squish it all together with your hands, or do it the hard way and use a wooden spoon. Taste a little...does it need more salt, sugar, or cinnamon? 
        5. Sprinkle the oat topping over the fruit. 
        6. Bake the crisp until the topping is golden brown, and the fruit is simmering when you open the oven. I like to check it after 30 minutes, but it may take 40.

        Newsletter | Week of May 14, 2018

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        In Our Baskets This Week

        *Certified Organic  |  **100% Grassfed  |  Meet Our Producers

        Vermont Vegetable Package

        • Red potatoes |  Deep Root/Samson Farm
        • European cucumber |  Deep Root/Ferme L'Abri
        • Butter Oyster Mushrooms*  |  Mousam Valley Mushrooms
        • Bok Choi*  |  Miskell's Premium Organics
        • Mesclun |  Jericho Settlers Farm/Unity Farm
        • Regular Size Only: Sunflower shoots*  |  Pitchfork Farm

        Omnivore Package

        The Omnivore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

        • Beef steak, T-Bone**  |  Health Hero Farm
        • Cultured butter  |  Ploughgate Creamery
        • Chimichurri  |  Joe's Kitchen @ Screamin' Ridge Farm 

        Localvore Package

        The Localvore Package includes the Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

        • Beef steak, T-Bone**  | Health Hero Farm
        • Cultured butter | Ploughgate Creamery
        • Chimichurri | Joe's Kitchen @ Screamin' Ridge Farm 
        • Bread: Mad River Grain*  |  Red Hen Baking Company, Middlesex, VT
        • Pasture Raised Eggs  |  Besteyfield Farm, Hinesburg, VT
         

        Bread: Mad River Grain*

        Red Hen Baking Co., Middlesex, VT

        Cheddar Cheese

        Shelburne Farms, Shelburne, VT

        Pasture Raised Eggs

        Besteyfield Farm, Hinesburg, VT

         

        Monthly Subscriptions

        • Ground Beef  |  Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
        • Pasture Raised Chicken  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
        • Sausage from Pastured Pigs  |  Andouille & Sweet Italian  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT
        • Bean Burgers* | Black Bean Burgers & Maple Chipotle Burgers  |  Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield, VT
        • Tortillas & Beans * | Soft White Corn Tortillas & Black Beans  |  All Souls Tortilleria, - Warren, VT and Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield, VT
        • Wild Alaskan Fish  |  Coho Salmon Fillets & Salmon Steaks  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT
        • Wild Alaskan Salmon  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT
         

        Cooking & Storage Tips

        This week, use up your lettuce right away, and followed by the mushrooms and sunflower shoots. We used the chimichurri from the Omnivore share to coat roasted potatoes, but you could also use it as a sauce for the steak, or in an omelette made with your Besteyfield eggs, or mixed with mayo to make a quick dip for European cucumbers. By itself, the T-bone is delicious, but it's extra good when combined with the mushrooms and a quick pan sauce (see below). The bok choi is great as a simple sauté, with some garlic, sesame oil and soy sauce. 

         

        Recipes

        The recipes below were planned and prepared by Suzanne and our amazing team of student interns. We welcome your feedback and suggestions for recipes and cooking tips!

        Seared Steak with Sautéed Mushrooms & a Pan Sauce

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        Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Main Dish | Diet: Omnivore

        This recipe is made by combining three of our other recipes: seared steak, sautéed mushrooms, and pan sauce

        All you've got to do is follow those recipes, pile the mushrooms atop the meat, and pour the sauce over, and you've got a delicious main course. 

        Seared Steak

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        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Main Dish | Diet: Omnivore

        A basic recipe for a slab of meat! 

        • a steak, pork chop, chicken leg, or what have you
        • salt
        • pepper
        • oil
        1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
        2. Remove the meat from its package, and using paper towels or a clean kitchen towel, pat it dry. 
        3. Liberally season both sides of the meat with salt and pepper. 
        4. Heat a large, heavy bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat. If you have a kitchen fan, turn it on. 
        5. When the pan is hot, add the oil. When the oil shimmers, gently place the meat in the pan. If you have more than one piece, arrange them so they're not touching. Try not to move the meat around once you've put it down.
        6. Cook until the meat is seared on the first side. When it is, you will find that it will easily release itself from the pan. 
        7. Flip the meat, turn off the burner, and place the pan in the oven.
        8. The cooking time will depend on the size of the steak/chop/leg, and how well done you wish it to be. You can use a thermometer to "temp" the meat, if you'd like. 
        9. When the meat is done, remove it from the pan, and let it rest. You can now deglaze the pan and make a sauce, if you wish. 

        Sautéed Mushrooms

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        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type:  Side | Diet: Vegetarian/Vegan/GF

        Sautéed mushrooms are incredibly versatile. They can be used in omelettes, as a topping on burgers, to garnish salads or vegetable dishes, atop seared meats, or simply eaten as a side dish.

        • mushrooms
        • butter or olive oil
        • salt
        • pepper
        1. Rinse the mushrooms, pull out the stems and save them for stock (I keep a "stockpile" in my freezer, in which I save bones and veggie scraps. When I have enough, I make a batch). Slice the mushroom caps. 
        2. Heat the fat in a large saucepan, and when hot, add the mushrooms, and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are tender, and slightly browned. 
        3. Use in whatever way suits your fancy. 

        Pan Sauce for Steak, Pork Chops or Chicken

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        Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment - Sauce | Diet: Omnivore

        If you keep stock in your freezer, you can make a pan sauce at a moment's notice. It's a quick way to add incredible flavor to simple food.

        • A pan in which you've just cooked something flavorful, such as mushrooms, caramelized onions, or seared meat.
        • stock (meat stock works best, because it includes gelatin and collagen) 
        • butter
        • salt
        • pepper
        • an acidic ingredient, such as vinegar or lemon juice
        • any other spices or herbs you desire
        1. While the pan is still hot, pour in a couple cups of stock (or more, depending on how much sauce you wish to make).
        2. Simmer the sauce and let it reduce until it thickens and has the consistency of a glaze.
        3. Turn off the pan, add a couple tablespoons of butter, and whisk until the butter is incorporated. This is called "mounting the sauce." When the butter has melted and been whisked in, the sauce will be nice and glossy, and thick.
        4. Taste the sauce, and season. It's great to use acidity and salt to balance out the flavors, and make them sing. Add a little bit at a time, tasting after each addition, until the sauce is glorious. 
        5. Serve over whatever you'd originally cooked in the pan, or anything that would be more delicious with sauce than without it.