Newsletter | Week of November 26, 2018

 
DeboraandStanYankeeaward.jpg
 

Meet Mt. Mansfield Creamery! Stan Biasini and Debora Wickart are the husband-and-wife duo behind the delicious cheese. Stan is a former chef who is now dedicated on mastering their cheese recipes. Together, they produce small batches of seasonally-inspired raw milk cheeses in a creamery only four miles away from their farm. On the farm, Debora milks around 30 registered Holstein and Brown Swiss cows per day, who produce award-winning milk. Their cows are rotationally grazed during warmer months, and fed a grain and hay in the winter months.

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified
Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers


Vermont Vegetable Package

Apples*** | Champlain Orchards, Shoreham, VT

Bok Choi* | Miskell’s Premium Organics, Charlotte, VT

Carrots* | Intervale Community Farm, Burlington, VT

Shiitake Mushrooms* | 1000 Stone Farm, Brookfield, VT

Small Yellow Onions* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Variety Size Only: Baby Fennel* | Jericho Settlers’ Farm, Jericho, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Pasture Raised Chicken Breast | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

“Chin Clip” Cheese | Mt. Mansfield Creamery, Morrisville, VT “This firm, decadent cheese starts off buttery and finishes with a nutty flavor. Pairs well with fruits and vegetables or your favorite red wine.” - Note from the cheese maker!

Maple Vinaigrette | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Pasture Raised Chicken Breast | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

Chin Clip Cheese | Mt. Mansfield Creamery,

Maple Vinaigrette | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Bread: Ciabatta Bread* | Red Hen Baking Co, Middlesex, VT

Pasture-Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm, Hinesburg, VT

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Ciabatta Bread* | Red Hen Baking Co., Middlesex, VT

Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

Cheddar Cheese | Shelburne Farms

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Bok Choi - this crisp green vegetable can be sauteed and ready to eat in just a few minutes. It pairs well with soy sauce and garlic. Serve in soup, or add to noodles or rice, or serve as a side dish to chicken or salmon.

Fennel might be a new vegetable for many of you! This is another delicious, crisp veggie with a unique flavor. You’ll often see it served raw, thinly sliced for salads (like our recipe below). If you don’t like the flavor raw, you can roast it! Try this recipe - Roasted Apple & Fennel with Toasted Hazelnuts and Goat Cheese

Learn a little more about fennel in our Tender Profile blog post!

Recipes


Newsletter | Week of November 19, 2018

 
CranberryBob.jpg
 

Meet Cranberry Bob! Bob Lesnikoski, of Vermont Cranberry Company, has been growing cranberries in Fletcher, Vermont since 1996. The farm grows about three acres of cranberries in constructed bogs. Bob happens to be a fisherman and mushroom forager as well! Vermont Cranberry Co. cranberries are grown using sustainable and ecological methods. 

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified
Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers


Vermont Vegetable Package

Brussels Sprouts** | Lewis Creek Farm, Starksboro, VT

Cranberries** | Vermont Cranberry Company, Fletcher, VT

Shallots* | Maple Wind Farm, Richmond/Huntington, VT

Braising Greens Mix* | Jericho Settlers’ Farm, Jericho, VT

Gold Potatoes* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Variety Size Only: Asian Pears*** | Champlain Orchards, Shoreham, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Pasture Raised Chorizo Sausage | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

Whole Plain Yogurt* | Butterworks Farm, Westfield, VT

Maple Syrup (Amber)* | Square Deal Farm, Walden, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Pasture Raised Chorizo Sausage | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

Whole Plain Yogurt* | Butterworks Farm, Westfield, VT

Maple Syrup (Amber)* | Square Deal Farm, Walden, VT

Bread: Polenta Bread* | Red Hen Baking Co, Middlesex, VT

Pasture-Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm, Hinesburg, VT

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Polenta Bread* | Red Hen Baking Co., Middlesex, VT

Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

Cheddar Cheese | Shelburne Farms

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Braising Greens Mix. Try a simple saute with butter and garlic!

Not in charge of cranberry sauce this year? Try Cranberry-Pear Crisp or homemade Cranberry Muffins with Walnut Crumb Topping!

Recipes

Thanksgiving Classics - Two Ways!

Brussels Sprouts: If your stovetop and oven will be full, try making slow-cooker Brussels sprouts! The vinegar will thicken during cooking for a delicious glaze. Or, if you have room in the oven, try roasting your Brussels sprouts, and build flavor with toasted nuts and a pungent local Vermont blue cheese!

Cranberry Sauce: You can stick with a very Vermont version, with apple cider and maple syrup added for sweetness, to balance the tart flavor of these fresh cranberries. Or, you can add in spices and citrus - with orange, ginger, and clove, for a more exotic addition to your Thanksgiving table!

Stuffing: Whether you’re starting with a stuffing mix or a fresh loaf of bread, you can build flavor in many different ways. Try a rich and savory chestnut and sausage stuffing for a hearty, filling side. Or, build vegetarian-friendly flavor with mushrooms for umami and celeriac for a light celery flavor that’s seasonally appropriate.

Newsletter | Week of November 12, 2018

Diggers+Mirth+Collective+Farm+Harvest+in+the+Intervale.jpg

Meet the Diggers! Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm is one of the certified organic farms located in Burlington’s Intervale… just down the road from the Intervale Food Hub and the Intervale Center! The Diggers have a unique cooperative model with a focus on local food access. You can find their Veggie Truck driving around the Old North End on warm summer evenings! In the picture above, the crew is harvesting mesclun mix on a late summer day. This week’s mesculn delivery will be our last delivery of a veggie harvested from an outdoor field until spring. We’ll deliver greens that are grown in hoop houses and greenhouses during our colder seasons.

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified
Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package

Garlic * | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT & Bella Farm, Monkton, VT

Leeks** | Lewis Creek Farm, Starksboro, VT

Shiitake Mushrooms* | 1000 Stone Farm, Brookfield, VT

Napa Cabbage* | Intervale Community Farm, Burlington’s Intervale, VT

Sweet Dumpling Squash* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Variety Size Only: Mesclun* | Diggers’ Mirth Farm, Burlington’s Intervale, VT

Variety Size Only: Cilantro* | Diggers’ Mirth Farm, Burlington’s Intervale, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Pasture Raised Chicken Drumsticks | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT

Vegetable Broth | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Kimchi* | Flack Family Farm, Enosburg Falls, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Pasture Raised Chicken Drumsticks | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT

Vegetable Broth | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Kimchi* | Flack Family Farm, Enosburg Falls, VT

Bread: Baguette* | Red Hen Baking Co, Middlesex, VT

Pasture-Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm, Hinesburg, VT

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Baguette* | Red Hen Baking Co., Middlesex, VT

Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

Cheddar Cheese | Shelburne Farms

 

Monthly Subscriptions Delivered This Week!

This will be the final delivery of Monthly Subscriptions for the Fall/Winter season.

 

Chicken  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT

Sausage  |  Montreal Spice and Andouille  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT

Ground Beef  |  Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT and Snug Valley Farm, East Hardwick VT

Tortilla & Bean  |  Hearty Heirloom Corn Tortillas from All Souls Tortilleria, Warren, VT  |  Black Beans from Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield VT

Bean Burgers  |  Black Bean and Sweet Potato  |  Vermont Bean Crafters, Waitsfield VT

Wild Salmon  |  Coho Salmon Fillet  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT

Wild Fish  |  Coho Salmon Fillet and Cod Fillet  |  Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Mesclun (for members with the Variety Package) This flavorful green will make a delicious quick salad! Try adding some roasted squash to your salad!

And, napa cabbage and mushrooms.

Napa cabbage has a nice tender texture that makes it much easier to use and quicker to cook down that a standard green cabbage.

Mushrooms will have the best flavor and texture if you use them up quickly!

Recipes

Order Your Thanksgiving Turkey from Maple Wind Farm

 
 

Looking for a delicious, sustainable Thanksgiving turkey for your holiday meal? Order a Maple Wind Farm turkey today!

All Maple Wind Farm turkeys are pasture raised and are moved daily to fresh grass. They are not fed hormones or antibiotics — ever. Turkeys are an important part of Maple Wind’s diversified farm: Beth and Bruce love raising turkeys! The noticeably improved taste and quality of the meat is a result of the birds’ freedom in the pasture, where they enjoy the grass and bugs and fresh air— turkeys are great foragers! Feed your friends and family with a special turkey this holiday season. 

Non-GMO turkeys were fed minimal amounts of grain that is Non-GMO to supplement their foraging on pasture. Organic turkeys were fed minimal amounts of Certified Organic grain to supplement their foraging on pasture.

Yes - these turkeys cost more than conventional turkeys. What’s behind the price? The careful process of raising birds on organic pasture, the high quality of their supplemental feed, and humane, ethical on-farm processing — unlike conventionally-raised meat, these practices result in a product that’s beneficial for the birds, the land they were raised on, and the farmers who raised and processed them, and is healthier and more nutritious for you to eat!

  • Non-GMO Pasture-Raised Turkeys: $5.25/pound ($20 deposit)

  • Organic (and therefore non-GMO) Pasture-Raised Turkeys: $6.45/pound ($25 deposit)

Please order your turkey by Wednesday, November 14th!
Pick up Monday November 19 or Tuesday November 20.


What Size?

Maple Wind Farm offers turkeys in 3 size ranges:

  • 9-12 lb

  • 13-17 lb

  • 18-22 lb

The general rule of thumb is that you can serve 1 person per pound of turkey. (Don’t forget you’ll want leftovers, too.) Your deposit will go toward the total price of your turkey. When you pick up your turkey here at the Intervale Food Hub, we will calculate the total price based on the exact weight of your turkey. You can pay with cash, check, credit/debit, or the payment source linked to your account.


Please order your turkey by Wednesday, November 14th!
Pick up Monday November 19 or Tuesday November 20 at the Intervale Food Hub


How to Order

You can call or email us to order! (802) 660-0440 x112

How to order online by Wednesday, November 14th:

  1. Go to the Pop-Up Shop

  2. Add the Turkey Deposit of your choice to your cart. There are 3 sizes of Non-GMO and 3 sizes of Organic to choose from.

  3. Click on the white “Cart” button and click “Check out”

  4. Complete your payment

  5. When you’re done, you’ll receive a confirmation email.

  6. Contact us to schedule your turkey pick up!

  7. At pick up, we will charge you the remaining balance due, based on the actual weight of your turkey. You can pay with cash, check, credit/debit, or the payment source linked to your account.


Holiday Delivery Schedule Changes for Fall/Winter 2018-19

1) Thanksgiving Week delivery schedule changes are outlined below. ONE ADDITIONAL CHANGE: Winooski Library Delivery will be on TUESDAY!

2) Winter Holiday Break: We will be closed for the weeks of December 26-30 and December 31-January 4. There will be no delivery during these 2 weeks.


During the week of Thanksgiving, we will make ALL DELIVERIES on Monday and Tuesday. Please see below for the updated schedule for the week of November 19, 2018.

Tuesday, November 20th

South End Home Delivery

New North End Home Delivery

VT Information Processing 1:00-5:00 PM  

Twincraft Skincare 1:30-5:30 PM  

MyWebGrocer/Marathon Health 2:00-5:00 PM  

VPR 2:30-5:00 PM  

EDGE Sports & Fitness - Essex 3:00-6:00 PM open until 10pm

REV Indoor Cycling 4:00-7:00 PM  

Winooski Library 3:00-6:00 PM open until 6:30 pm

Intervale Food Hub Official Pick Up  12:30 - 6:00pm  

Monday, November 19th

Old North End Home Delivery

All Wellness 1:30-4:30 PM open until 6:30 pm

Zero Gravity 2:00-9:00 PM open until 9 pm

Dealer.com 2:00-5:30 PM  

UVM Medical Center Main Campus 2:30-6:00 PM  

Community Health Center 3:30-6:30 PM open until 8 pm

Maglianero 1:00-5:00 PM  

VT Department of Health 1:30-5:00 PM  

VT Pub & Brewery 2:00-11:00 PM  

YMCA 2:00-5:00 PM open until 8pm

Hickock & Boardman Building 2:30-5:30 PM  

VT Gas 2:30-5:00 PM  

Data Innovations 2:30-6:00 PM  

EDGE Sports & Fitness - Williston 3:00-6:00 PM open until 8pm

Intervale Food Hub will be open 9am - 6 pm

 

If you schedule change does not work for you schedule, or if you are going to be out of town, you have a few options!

  1. You can pick up at the Intervale Center from 12:30-6:00 pm on Monday November 19 or Tuesday November 20.

  2. You can hold delivery, and double up at a later date.

  3. You can hold delivery, and receive account credit toward the Pop-Up Shop (75% of the average weekly value)

Please let us know at your earliest convenience if you’d like to make a change.

Email us or call Kendall at (802) 660-0440 x112

 

Newsletter | Week of November 5, 2018

Onions at Burnt Rock Farm. Courtesy of Burnt Rock Farm.

Onions curing for storage at Burnt Rock Farm in Huntington, VT. Burnt Rock Farm is located in the Huntington River Valley, just about 25 miles southeast of Burlington, VT. Justin Rich and his crew specialize in growing certified organic vegetable varieties that will store well for Vermont’s cold winter months.

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified
Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package

Rainbow Carrots* | River Berry Farm, Fairfax, VT

Celeriac* | Intervale Community Farm

Spigariello* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington, VT (see cooking tips below for more info!)

Yellow Onions* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Sweet Potatoes* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Variety Size Only: Red Potatoes* | Valley Dream Farm, Cambridge, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Grass-Fed Beef Stew Meat | Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Snug Valley Farm, East Hardwick, VT

Beef Broth | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery, Fayston, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

Grass-Fed Beef Stew Meat | Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Snug Valley Farm, East Hardwick, VT

Beef Broth | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery, Fayston, VT

Bread: Rustic Rolls* | Red Hen Baking Co, Middlesex, VT

Pasture-Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm, Hinesburg, VT

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Rustic Rolls* | Red Hen Baking Co., Middlesex, VT

Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

Cheddar Cheese | Shelburne Farms

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Spigariello

This leafy green vegetable is an heirloom variety that’s very similar to broccoli raab or kale - it’s in the brassica (kale/broccoli/cabbage) family, but the flavor is mild and slightly sweet. Traditionally, spigariello is native to southern Italy. Trim the stems if they’re tougher than you like.

We recommend sautéing spigariello with butter and olive oil, some thinly sliced onion and/or garlic, some red pepper flakes, and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar! You can serve it as a side dish or stir into your favorite pasta.

What’s that? Celeriac - (the lumpy one!) this is probably a new vegetable for many of you! The texture is surprisingly light and less starchy than a potato or most other root vegetables, so it can add a nice light airiness to dishes. The flavor is very much like celery, so you can use it in soups and slaws, to replace celery (especially because organic celery does not grow easily in Vermont).

Just give it a good scrub and peel it with a knife or regular vegetable peeler to get the rough outer layer cleaned off. Then you can slice it, dice it, grate it, or cut it into thin matchsticks for a variety of recipes! We feature it a few ways this week
- Raw (in apple-carrot-celeriac slaw)
- Scalloped and baked with potatoes
- Roasted with carrots and sweet potatoes into “Seasonal Fries”

Tender Profile

Recipes

Tender Profile | Celeriac (Celery Root)

IMG_0333.jpg

Botanical name/plant family: Apium graveolens repaceum

Important practices: Like celery, I should be purchased organically, as conventionally grown versions are likely to have high pesticide residue levels.

Harvest season: Find me from October to February.

Great source of: Vitamins C, K and B6. I’m lower in strachy carbs than most root vegetables, so substituting me in for part of a recipe lowers the overall carbohydrate and calorie content.

Storage methods: Trim my roots and stalks, then wrap me up in plastic and store me in the fridge for up to 10 days.

Cooking methods:

  • Peel me and add some lemon juice or vinegar to prevent browning while preparing.

  • Add me raw to salads

  • Grate me into a remoulade with mayo, lemon juice and dijon mustard.

  • Substitute me partially for potatoes in soups, stews, hashes, casseroles, or mash me with them!

  • I’m also great roasted.

World cuisines: Celeriac is popular in the Mediterranean, especially in France. I’m also especially popular in German cuisine, much more so than in the U.S.!

Pairings: I have a strong, distinct flavor similar to celery, so I’m best paired with other strong flavors to balance me out, such as ginger, dill or horseradish. I’m great with other root vegetables like potatoes, parsnips or turnips, as well as mushrooms, cauliflower and leeks.

Fun Facts

  • I’m one of the oldest root vegetables in history!

  • I’m technically the same plant as celery, but I’m cultivated for my root instead of my stem.

Newsletter | Week of October 29, 2018

1000 stone farm

Meet 1000 Stone Farm! Our new partners for delicious, Vermont-grown, and certified organic mushrooms. This small fruit and vegetable farm is located in the rocky, rolling hills of Brookfield, VT (near our pals at Fat Toad Farm!) We’re so happy we’ve found another great small family farm in Vermont to share with you. Mushrooms add a really nice variety to our Vermont Vegetable packages throughout the year. Enjoy!

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified |  Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package

  • Mesclun* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington, VT

  • Brussels Sprouts * and ** | Lewis Creek Farm, Starksboro, VT (Vermont Ecologically Grown) and Kettle Song Farm

  • Carrots* | Pitchfork Farm, Burlington, VT

  • Red Kuri Winter Squash* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

  • Gold Potatoes* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

  • Chesnut Mushrooms* | 1000 Stone Farm, Brookfield, VT

  • Variety Size Only: Rosemary* | Red Wagon Plants, Hinesburg, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Pasture Raised Chicken Legs | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

  • Frozen Strawberries* | Adam’s Berry Farm, Charlotte, VT

  • Maple Vinaigrette | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Pasture Raised Chicken Legs | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

  • Frozen Strawberries* | Adam’s Berry Farm, Charlotte, VT

  • Maple Vinaigrette | Joe’s Kitchen, East Montpelier, VT

  • Bread: Mad River Grain* | Red Hen Baking Company

  • Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Mad River Grain*

Red Hen Baking Co.

Cheddar Cheese

Shelburne Farms

Pasture Raised Eggs

Besteyfield Farm

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Mesclun, Brussels Sprouts, and Mushrooms

Recipes

We are Hiring! Intervale Food Hub Buyer

 
DS4A8330.jpg
 

Summary of Position:

The Intervale Center seeks a dynamic, mission-driven part-time Food Hub Buyer to join our team in Burlington, Vermont.

For 30 years, the Intervale Center has led a community food revolution that sustains farms, land and people. We have pioneered farm and food innovations like Community Supported Agriculture, commercial composting, riparian restoration, farm business incubation, gleaning and food hub development.

The Intervale Food Hub Buyer will manage the procurement and sourcing strategy, negotiate contracts, purchase products, onboard new suppliers and oversee our relationships with suppliers in support of the Intervale Food Hub, a local foods retail business that sells a range of products directly to individuals and families in the greater Burlington area.

This part-time position (24 hours/week) reports to the Food Hub Director and is an important part of the business’s operations team.

Roles and Responsibilities:

• Manages procurement and sourcing strategy, including contract and negotiation decisions, to improve quality, profitability and vendor relations

• Negotiates product contracts with growers based on quality parameters • Creates custom market/sourcing reports for distribution internally

• Reports to team about grower fields and monitors progress of upcoming crops and potential shortages/overages

• Effectively communicates with suppliers to ensure timely deliveries, excellent product quality, continuous improvement and improving lead times

• Facilitates the development of new suppliers to help them reach the level of excellence required by Food Hub standards

• Evaluates and selects suppliers based on their ability to supply product in accordance with the IFH’s requirements, such as quality, contract compliance, and accuracy

• Works with other parts of the Food Hub to determine volume needs or consumer preference

• Places orders, creates PO's and does all required follow up until product is successfully received

• Spot-checks the quality of incoming product

• Works with suppliers on delivery problems, shortages and product returns

• Develops and maintains good, positive working relationships with suppliers, brokers, agents, sales contacts and/or importers

• Works with accounting on PO/invoice discrepancies

• Creates and maintains crop plan and adjusts as needed after the end of each season, updating necessary follow-through on price changes and allowances

• Acts as the Food Hub expert on matters related to product quality, market trends and the science of perishable inventory management

• Works with Food Hub team on strategic planning and overall business development Page 2 of 2

• Attends Intervale Center staff meetings and special events as necessary

• Contributes to a highly productive, collaborative and clean work environment

• Acts as an ambassador for the entire organization, promote philanthropy, and engage in relationship building in support of Intervale Center Development

Minimum Qualifications:

We are seeking a highly qualified local foods buyer. An ideal candidate will bring:

• Significant, demonstrated experience in product buying and handling required, farming experience preferred

• A minimum of 2 years procurement experience

• Demonstrated knowledge of produce quality standards

• Strong organization, communication and time management skills and attention to detail

• Ability to work both independently and as part of a team

• Positive attitude, patience, creativity and a great sense of humor

• Ability to lift 50 pounds

• Valid VT driver’s license with clean driving record

Intervale Center is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

To apply, please send a cover letter, resume and three references to jobs@intervale.org by October 26th.

Compensation is commensurate with experience and includes limited wellness benefits. Position is based in Burlington with opportunity to work remotely

Tender Profile | Apples

DS4A7450.jpg

Botanical name/plant family: Malus pumila

Important practices (organic/grassfed/etc.): According to the Environmental Workers Group, 90 percent of conventional apples had detectable pesticide residue; it is recommended to buy organic apples.

Harvest season: I am crisp and juicy August through October

Great source of: Fiber and Vitamin C, I have the ability to improve digestion, lower inflammation and improve heart health!

Storage methods: The best place for me to be for storage is the crisper drawer of the refrigerator, if you don’t have room in the fridge they will also stay fresh on the counter, just not for as long.

Cooking methods: Apples have made their name as an easy household snack, that doesn’t mean they can’t be enhanced by sauteing, baking, roasting, or blending!

World cuisines: Apples are commonly grown in North America and thus represent a lot of American food.

Pairings: I’m sweet and tart so naturally I pair flawlessly with a variety of flavors. Try an old classic, the Waldorf salad, a mix of grapes, walnuts, celery, apples all mixed with mayo or yogurt all over a bed of lettuce. You can top any salad with apples for a sweet unexpected crunch! Apples are also a star for desserts of all kinds, stewing apples down and putting in pies, crisps or atop ice cream is sure to be a hit.

Fun Facts:

  • There are currently 2,500 varieties of apples being grown in North America, regardless the crabapple is the only native one.

  • It takes about 36 apples to create a gallon of apple cider!

  • Americans eat more apples than any other fresh fruits, averaging 16 pounds of fresh apples.

Newsletter | Week of October 22, 2018

River Berry Farm

Meet River Berry Farm! Owner David Marchant has been a partner of the Intervale Food Hub from our first season. This certified organic farm in Northern Vermont specializes in growing a variety of vegetables and berries. Their farm stand, pictured above, is home to a lovely greenhouse filled with perennial and annual plants for sale in the summer, and pumpkins in the fall.

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified |  Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package

  • Red Leaf Lettuce * | River Berry Farm, Fairfax, VT

  • Sweet Potatoes* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

  • Kale* /** | River Berry Farm, Fairfax, VT (Organic) and Lewis Creek Farm, Starksboro, VT (Vermont Ecologically Grown)

  • Red Onions* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

  • Blondee or Liberty Apples*** | Champlain Orchards, Shoreham, VT

  • Variety Size Only: Leeks** | Lewis Creek Farm, Starksboro, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Pasture Raised Pork Chops | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

  • Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery, Fayston, VT

  • Caramel Sauce | Fat Toad Farm, Brookfield, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Pasture Raised Pork Chops | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington/Richmond, VT

  • Cultured Butter | Ploughgate Creamery, Fayston, VT

  • Caramel Sauce | Fat Toad Farm, Brookfield, VT

  • Bread: Polenta* | Red Hen Baking Company

  • Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Polenta*

Red Hen Baking Co.

Cheddar Cheese

Shelburne Farms

Pasture Raised Eggs

Besteyfield Farm

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Lettuce and Kale

Sweet Potatoes can be stored in a cool, dark, and dry place, like a pantry. You can peel them before cooking or feel free to leave the peel on - just give them a good scrub first!

Red onions are best stored in a cool, dark, dry place as well - though if you keep them in the refrigerator, you won’t cry as much when you cut them!

Try this recipe from the Kitchn for Quick-Pickled Red Onions! These would be delicious added to your grain bowl or vegetable hash, or to top salads or sandwiches, too.

Apples, leeks, kale, and lettuce should be stored in the refrigerator.

With leeks, you’ll want to cut the tougher, greener parts of the leek off and keep the tender white sections. Be sure to give them a good rinse, because dirt and sand can be trapped between the layers.

 

Recipes

Top 10 Reasons to Join the Intervale Food Hub!

 
Eco-Apple certified fruit at Champlain Orchards in Shoreham, VT

Eco-Apple certified fruit at Champlain Orchards in Shoreham, VT

 


#1. Support for Vermont farms and food makers

The Vermont farms and food makers we partner with are at the heart of everything we do. When you sign up for the season, you're providing reliability and stability to our producers, so they can focus on what they're so good at - creating delicious food! 

In the Fall/Winter season, when farm stands close and farmers markets slow down, there is still so much amazing local food to enjoy. 

 

#2. Promote healthy, sustainable farming practices

We partner with farms who are dedicated to sustainability. About 90% of the food that we source is certified organic, and the rest is grown or harvested using transparent, sustainable practices. Our farmers are contributing to keeping Vermont's land, air, and water healthy and clean!

 
Ben Butterfield collecting pasture-raised eggs from Besteyfield Farm’s laying hens

Ben Butterfield collecting pasture-raised eggs from Besteyfield Farm’s laying hens

 

 #3. Help small farms grow

As a Food Hub member, you're providing reliability and stability that helps farms grow! Whether it's Red Wagon Plants budding herb business, or Besteyfield Farm's move to bigger pastures to increase egg production, we're working together to help Vermont farms thrive.

 

#4. Support the work of the Intervale Center

The not-for-profit Intervale Center is home to the Intervale Food Hub. We envision food systems that support joyful and vibrant communities, thriving farms and food businesses, healthy natural resources, and nourished, happy people.

 
Andy Jones harvesting organic broccoli at Intervale Community Farm in Burlington’s Intervale

Andy Jones harvesting organic broccoli at Intervale Community Farm in Burlington’s Intervale

 

 #5. Cook with more nutrient-rich ingredients

The sustainable farming practices that our farmers use are not just good for the earth -they're good for you, too -- whether it's more vitamins and minerals in fresh produce organic produce, or healthier fats and more vitamins and minerals in grass-fed dairy. Regular deliveries of fresh, local food make it much easier to eat more nutritiously. Treat yourself!

 

#6. Embrace the changing seasons

Each season in Vermont is different - embrace the flavors and enjoy the variety that comes with the changes in local fruit, veggies, and other local specialty items from month to month! 

 
Nancy and John Hayden harvesting organic rhubarb at The Farm Between in Jeffersonville, VT

Nancy and John Hayden harvesting organic rhubarb at The Farm Between in Jeffersonville, VT

 

#7. Learn new cooking techniques

Check out our weekly email newsletter for recipes and cooking tips - we try to cover every ingredient that you get! We've also started a series of cooking classes for members - so you can gain hands-on experience learning helpful cooking techniques! 

 

#8. Try new ingredients and new flavors

With the changing seasons, you'll always find your old favorite vegetables in the rotation -- but you might find a new favorite vegetable or recipe, too! Learning from our team and fellow Intervale Food Hub members is always fun and enjoyable.

 
Nick and Bobby packing up organic kabocha squash at the Intervale Food Hub

Nick and Bobby packing up organic kabocha squash at the Intervale Food Hub

 

#9. Take advantage of flexible payments and vacation options

We've added lots of convenience to our subscriptions. As always, you can pay in set up recurring installments if you'd rather not pay in full. Plus, if you'll be out of town for a delivery, we have several vacation options now, too! 

 

#10. Customize your weekly delivery

We now offer our Vermont Vegetable Package in 3 different sizes, so you can find the perfect fit. We also offer an online Pop-Up Shop, so you can add eggs, cheese, meat, bean burgers, and other delicious local ingredients to your order from week-to-week.

 

 

What's your favorite reason to support the Intervale Food Hub?

Join us for the Fall/Winter Season!

 Sign up by Friday, October 26th

Newsletter | Week of October 15, 2018

Does Leap

Meet Does Leap! This innovative, diversified certified organic farm in Northern Vermont is home to the adorable goats behind our chevre and feta cheese. Raising animals on lush green pastures in the Green Mountains results in an exceptional quality of food. "We enjoy producing food that people love and in a way that improves our farm and enriches both our lives and our landscapes."

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified |  Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package

  • Baby Spinach* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington’s Intervale, and Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

  • Red Potatoes* | Valley Dream Farm, Cambridge VT

  • Carrots* | Pitchfork Farm, Burlington VT

  • Chioggia Beets* | Pitchfork Farm, Burlington VT

  • Hosui Asian Pears*** | Champlain Orchards, Shoreham VT

  • Brussels Sprouts* | Kettle Song Farm, Worcester VT

  • Variety Size Only: “Festival” Sweet Dumpling Squash* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Grass Fed Sirloin Steak | Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Snug Valley Farm in East Hardwick, VT

  • Feta Goat Cheese* | Does’ Leap Farm, Bakersfield, VT

  • Chimichurri Sauce | Joe’s Kitchen, Screamin’ Ridge Farm, East Montpelier, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Grass Fed Sirloin Steak | Health Hero Farm, South Hero, VT and Snug Valley Farm in East Hardwick, VT

  • Feta Goat Cheese* | Does’ Leap Farm, Bakersfield, VT

  • Chimichurri Sauce | Joe’s Kitchen, Screamin’ Ridge Farm, East Montpelier, VT

  • Bread: Waitsfield Common* | Red Hen Baking Company

  • Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Baguette*

Red Hen Baking Co.

Cheddar Cheese

Shelburne Farms

Pasture Raised Eggs

Besteyfield Farm

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Baby Spinach and Brussels Sprouts

Week 20, here we go! This week is the start of “storage crop season.” Farms are wrapping up the last of their harvests from the field - including vegetables that were grown especially for their flavor and capacity to store well into the colder months for us to enjoy.

We’re featuring some great varieties of these vegetables to keep things interesting! The “chioggia” beets have a striped inner flesh that makes them visually interesting - but you can use them in any beet recipe.

The “Festival” sweet dumpling squash is colorful and a great manageable size - and it makes a perfect bowl!

Brussels sprouts have come into season a little earlier than we expected, and we were available to source some (though relatively small bags) for everyone this week! Perfect for a side dish or salad.

Our best cooking tip for this week is ROASTING! In the recipes below, we roasted a big batch of beets, carrots, brussels sprouts, and squash. That way, you can cook once and have lots of meals. We’ve added them to soup and salad, and you could also add them to grain bowls or serve them as side dishes over the course of the week.

 

Recipes

Newsletter | Week of October 8, 2018

does leap.jpg

Meet BTV Honey! BTV Honey, owned by Beekeepers Bill Mares and Dan Goosens, features honey from hives in the Burlington area — including hives right here in the Intervale!

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified |  Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package - Starter

  • Bok Choi* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington’s Intervale

  • Honeynut Winter Squash* | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT

  • Yellow Onions* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington, VT

  • Garlic* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington, VT and Bella Farm, Monkton, VT

  • Mushrooms* | 1000 Stones Farm, Brookfield, VT (a new producer to the Intervale Food Hub!)

Vermont Vegetable Package - Variety

  • Bok Choi* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington’s Intervale

  • Honeynut Winter Squash* | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT

  • Yellow Onions* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington, VT

  • Garlic* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington, VT and Bella Farm, Monkton, VT

  • Mushrooms* | 1000 Stones Farm, Brookfield, VT (a new producer to the Intervale Food Hub!)

  • “Blondee” Apples*** | Champlain Orchards, Shoreham, VT

  • Romaine Lettuce* | River Berry Farm, Fairfax, VT

Vermont Vegetable Package - Value

  • Bok Choi* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington’s Intervale

  • Honeynut Winter Squash* | Maple Wind Farm, Huntington & Richmond, VT

  • Yellow Onions* | Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington, VT

  • Mushrooms* | 1000 Stone Farm, Brookfield, VT (a new producer to the Intervale Food Hub!)

  • “Blondee” Apples*** | Champlain Orchards, Shoreham, VT

  • Romaine Lettuce* | River Berry Farm, Fairfax, VT

Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Wild Alaskan Salmon Fillet | Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT

  • Whole Plain Yogurt* | Butterworks Farm, Westfield, VT

  • Honey | BTV Honey, Burlington, VT (To slow crystallization, store honey in a tightly lidded container at room temperature. Honey can also be frozen, which stops crystallization, but it should never be kept in the refrigerator, which speeds it up. Heating can degrade the honey, so heat should be avoided whenever possible.)

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Wild Alaskan Salmon Fillet | Starbird Fish, Burlington, VT

  • Whole Plain Yogurt* | Butterworks Farm, Westfield, VT

  • Honey | BTV Honey, Burlington, VT (To slow crystallization, store honey in a tightly lidded container at room temperature. Honey can also be frozen, which stops crystallization, but it should never be kept in the refrigerator, which speeds it up. Heating can degrade the honey, so heat should be avoided whenever possible.)

  • Bread: Baguette* | Red Hen Baking Company

  • Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Baguette*

Red Hen Baking Co.

Cheddar Cheese

Shelburne Farms

Pasture Raised Eggs

Besteyfield Farm

MONTHLY SUBSCRIPTIONS

  • Grass Fed Ground Beef | Maple Wind Farm | Huntington, VT

  • Pasture Raised Chicken | Maple Wind Farm | Huntington, VT

  • Pasture Raised Sausage | Maple Wind Farm | Huntington, VT
    Flavors: Sweet Italian and Chorizo

  • Bean Burgers* | Vermont Bean Crafters | Waitsfield, VT | Flavors: Black Bean Burgers & Sweet Potato

  • Tortillas & Beans* | All Souls Tortilleria - Warren, VT | Vermont Bean Crafters - Waitsfield, VT

  • Wild Alaskan Salmon | Starbird Fish | Burlington, VT

  • Wild Fish | Starbird Fish | Burlington, VT | Varieties: Coho Salmon and Cod

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: Bok Choi and Mushrooms

Did you know leafy green Bok Choi is a nutritional powerhouse? It also takes about 5 minutes to prepare, which we love. Check out the Tender Profile below to learn more about it!

We’re very excited to introduce you to mushrooms from 1000 Stone Farm. As many of you may know, we used to source organic Vermont mushrooms from a small producer in Colchester. However, when he scaled down his business, we were stuck! We had difficulty finding enough organic mushrooms in Vermont, so we partnered with an organic family farm in Maine for about a year. Now, we’ve found a wonderful partner in 1000 Stone Farm, and beautiful, fresh, high quality mushrooms. Enjoy!

Honeynut Squash is here! This is a special new variety of winter squash, developed by Dan Barber and co, chef and co-owner of Blue Hill Farm / Blue Hill at Stone Barns, and Cornell University’s plant breeding program. The idea was to create more flavor in a smaller package. Read the story here on Bon Appetit! You can use this honeynut squash is just about any of your favorite winter squash recipes.

 

Tender Profiles

Learn some fun facts about these local ingredients, and check out recipes for each one as well!

Recipes

Tender Profile | Bok Choi

jodie-morgan-464042-unsplash.jpg

Botanical name/plant family: Brassica rapa chinensis

Important practices: Like other varieties of cabbage, I'm less of a threat to pests, which means that generally, less pesticides are used on me than other vegetables. We always recommend purchasing organic for better flavor and nutrition!

Harvest season: I'm available year-round, but fall and spring are my peak.

Great source of: I have one of the highest concentrations of nutrients per calorie of any vegetable! I'm full of Vitamins A, C, and K, and am a good source of folate, vitamin B6, and calcium as well. I also contain the mineral selenium, which isn't found in many other fruits or vegetables.

Storage methods: I'm best kept in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your fridge. I'll last about a week!

Cooking methods: I'm best added to soups, braised, or sautéed, either on my own or with other veggies in a stir-fry. I like to hide dirt in between my stalks, so make sure to separate them like you would celery, and rinse me well before cooking. I come in baby and mature varieties, but either way, the whole plant can be eaten.

World cuisines: I'm a Chinese variation of cabbage, so you can often find me in Chinese or other Asian dishes.

Pairings: I'm very porous, meaning I absorb the flavors of whatever you cook me with. However, I go especially well with soy sauce, ginger, garlic, sesame, and mushrooms.

 

Fun Fact:

  • I'm sometimes referred to as "soup spoon" due to the shape of my leaves.

  • I'm made up of 95% water.

  • I've been cultivated for over 5,000 years.

23 Favorite Fall/Winter Recipes

We are so excited for the upcoming Fall/Winter season! We’ve been cooking up a storm here at the Intervale Food Hub — and we’re happy to share our Fall/Winter recipe collection with you! The recipes below highlight the wide variety of fresh, colorful of Vermont vegetables that come with our Fall/Winter Vermont Vegetable Packages. All of these were cooked using ingredients from our weekly deliveries!

Are you wondering, “What’s even available in the winter?” We’re here to tell you that there is an amazing variety of local fruits and vegetables available, and our recipes will help you make delicious, simple meals at home.

Sign up for the Fall/Winter season to enjoy delicious meals like these, from November through February!

Newsletter | Week of October 1, 2018

Pitchfork Farm

Meet Pitchfork Farm! This certified organic farm is located in Burlington’s Intervale, right down the road from the Intervale Food Hub & the Intervale Center offices. The Intervale is also home to Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Intervale Community Farm, and several other farms that all specialize in growing delicious, certified organic fruit, vegetables, and herbs. It’s amazing how much food is grown right here in Burlington! Here, the Pitchfork Farm crew is harvesting arugula.

 

In Our Baskets This Week

*Certified Organic **Ecologically Grown ***Eco-Apple Certified |  Meet Our Farmers and Food Makers

Vermont Vegetable Package

  • Mesclun* | Diggers’ Mirth Collective Farm, Burlington’s Intervale

  • Carrots* | Pitchfork Farm, Burlington’s Intervale

  • Sweet Peppers* | Intervale Community Farm, Burlington’s Intervale & River Berry Farm, Fairfax, VT

  • Broccoli** | Lewis Creek Farm, Starksboro

  • “Beurre D’Anjou” Pears*** | Champlain Orchards, Shoreham, VT

  • Variety Size only: Arugula* | Pitchfork Farm, Burlington’s Intervale



Omnivore Package

The Omnivore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Grass Fed Ground Beef | Maple Wind Farm in Huntington/Richmond, VT

  • “Halfpipe” Cheese | Mt. Mansfield Creamery in Morrisville, VT

  • “Pink Lady” Fermented Vegetables* | Flack Family Farm in Enosburg Falls, VT

Localvore Package

The Localvore Package includes your Vermont Vegetable Package above, plus...

  • Grass Fed Ground Beef | Maple Wind Farm in Huntington/Richmond, VT

  • “Halfpipe” Cheese | Mt. Mansfield Creamery in Morrisville, VT

  • “Pink Lady” Fermented Vegetables* | Flack Family Farm in Enosburg Falls, VT

  • Bread: Rustic Rolls* | Red Hen Baking Company

  • Pasture Raised Eggs | Besteyfield Farm

 

Weekly Subscriptions

Bread: Ciabatta*

Red Hen Baking Co.

Cheddar Cheese

Shelburne Farms

Pasture Raised Eggs

Besteyfield Farm

 

Cooking & Storage Tips

Eat this first: GREENS - arugula and mesclun are the most perishable - be sure to eat these first!

The first broccoli of the season coming in from Lewis Creek Farm (the same farm that we received cauliflower from last week)! These cruciferous vegetables (the plant family that also includes arugula, Brussels sprouts, kale, cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli) are super-nutritious, featuring fiber; Vitamins C, E, and K; carotenoids, folate, and minerals. They can be finicky and tough to grow in Vermont because of weather & pests, but we’re working with lots of great farms that are learning how to manage these factors while using safe, sustainable practices.

Arugula (also a cruciferous vegetable) has a peppery, spicy taste that’s a little more exciting than other mild greens. You can add it to your mesclun salad mix for more flavor. Or, you can add this to pizza or pasta for a simple, flavorful meal. Try this recipe for “Lemony Pasta with Wilted Arugula”from Martha Stewart, or a Mediterranean-inspired “Chickpea, Red Pepper, and Arugula Salad” from MyRecipes.

 

Tender Profiles

Learn some fun facts about these local ingredients, and check out recipes for each one as well!

Recipes

Tender Profile | Arugula

Harvesting Arugula at Pitchfork Farm in Burlington’s Intervale

Harvesting Arugula at Pitchfork Farm in Burlington’s Intervale

Arugula, a.k.a. Eruca sativa

Who am I?

  • Plant family: Brassicaceae

  • Harvest season: Arugula is harvested from late spring through fall

  • Botanical details: Small leafy green with a peppery flavor

  • Great source of*: Folic Acid, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Iron, and Magnesium

*contains more than 10% of the recommended daily allowance for these nutrients

How to care for me:

  • Wash and dry my leaves and wrap me in paper towel inside a plastic bag, I like the vegetable crisper section of the fridge.

Pairings:

  • With a rather prominent pepper undertones, I pair well with sweet things like strawberries, beets and pears as well as more complex flavors like tomato, pungent cheeses, and don't forget the balsamic vinegar!

  • You can find me in Mediterranean and Italian cuisines!

Fun Facts:

  • In India the leaves of arugula are not commonly used however the seeds of the plant are pressed to produce oil known as taramira that is used for medicinal and cosmetic purposes.

  • Mention of arugula can be found in several religious texts, in 2 Kings in the Bible it is referred to as oroth and in Jewish texts such as the Mishna and Talmud that date back to the first through fifth century AD.

  • Arugula’s spicy aroma and flavor make it naturally resistant to pests.

Tender Profile | Bell Peppers

Bell peppers at River Berry Farm

Bell peppers at River Berry Farm

Botanical name/plant family: Capsicum annuum

Important practices: According to the Environmental Working Group, conventionally grown bell peppers contain high levels of pesticide residues - look for organically grown peppers!

Harvest season: Summer

Great source of: Vitamin B6, Vitamin C (Excellent source!!! 97% DV in green peppers, and near 300% in red)

Storage methods: Store bell peppers in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator for 1-2 weeks.

Cooking methods: I am crisp and sweet raw, though I also am great pickled, stuffed, grilled, sauteed, and stir fried! Roast me and remove my seeds for a delicious addition to sandwiches and salads, or puree me with garbanzo beans and tahini to make a flavorful hummus.

World cuisines: Bell peppers are indigenous to South/Central America, but were brought back to Europe in the 1400s by Christopher Columbus and incorporated into cuisines worldwide.

Pairings: I have a very distinct sweet flavor, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t pair well with savory ingredients. Serve me with onions, beans, lean pork, steak, zucchini, basil, salmon, and more!

 

Fun Facts

  • Unlike other members of the Capsicum family, bell peppers do not contain capsaicin, the compound that provides the pungency and kick to spicier varieties of peppers such as Serrano and Jalapeño.

  • Peppers have genders! Those with 3 lobes on the bottom are female, while those with 4 are male. Female peppers are sweeter and have more seeds and are better eaten raw and in salads, while male peppers are less sweet and contain less seeds and are better stir fried or sauteed.

  • All peppers begin as green peppers. Yellow red, and purple peppers are simply more ripened and therefore sweeter!

 

Cooking Class Notes | Roasted Chicken with Roasted Winter Squash, Caramelized Onions, and Brown Butter-Cider Dressing

 
A glimpse of our first-ever cooking class!

A glimpse of our first-ever cooking class!

 

Cooking Class Notes

Class with Suzanne, Kendall, and Gabby, on September 19, 2018

Thank you so much to our members who joined us for our first-ever cooking class! This blog post includes notes on just about everything we covered in class. If you missed the class, you can still follow along with our detailed notes. Please feel free to be in touch with any follow-up questions.



Tips and Q&A

  • It’s ok to be messy and not have the perfect equipment! It’s good to try new things and it’s OK to make mistakes!

  • Cooking at home is almost always healthier.

  • Rarely is there a right or wrong way – read up online, try it out, and don’t hesitate to ask!

  • Use your sense of smell and hearing too – smell for when something smells good & done, listen for sizzling on the stove or in the oven.

  • These exact ingredients might not come in one week’s basket, but throughout the season you can use these techniques and mix and match ingredients!


Overview and Outline

I. Start caramelizing onions

II. Start reducing apple cider

III. Peel & start roasting squash

IV. Breaking down and roasting a whole chicken
(and how to make chicken stock later)

V. Browned Butter & Reduced Cider Dressing

 


Caramelized Onions

Where to use them:

Pizza, salads, sandwiches, in grain bowls with roasted vegetables, to top casseroles or mashed potatoes, in burritos or omelettes, on crackers with cheese… anywhere you would use regular onions!

Tips:

  • Overall cook time: about 1 hour 15 min

  • Store in the fridge for up to 6 days or store in the freezer to add to heated meals later

  • We used yellow onions, but you can use red onions too!

  • Oil: 50/50 blend of olive oil and grapeseed oil or 50/50 blend of oil and butter

How to caramelize onions:

1.       Peel and cut onions into slivers. When you add them to a pan or pot, remember that they will reduce and cook down!

2.       Add oil, salt, and water to the pot

3.       Cook over medium-low heat, stirring every 10-15 minutes. You want them to brown, but slowly. If you hear a lot of sizzling or see them browning too quickly, add water and/or turn down the heat.


Q&A

  • How do you avoid crying while chopping onions?

  • We don’t really know! Try chilling them or grab your goggles!

 


Roasted Squash

Tips:

  • We used Kabocha Squash (large orange squash with big seeds), Butternut Squash (pale yellow with a longer neck and seeds just in the bottom), and Blue Hubbard Squash (pale blue-green on the outside and orange on the inside with large seeds).

  • Different varieties of squash will have slightly different shapes, textures, and flavors, which can lend to different uses, but in general, you can use them interchangeably. We encourage you to try as many different kinds as you can!

  • We used 50/50 blend of grapeseed/olive oil

  • Having a large, sharp chef’s knife and a quality vegetable peeler will make this job noticeably easier! Make sure hands are above the knife if cutting something large and tough.

 

Where to use it:

ANYWHERE. In tacos, blended into soup, served over rice or grains, in a salad, mashed as a side dish, on pizza, blended with beans to make a dip, in an omelette, baked into muffins or breakfast bread, added to mac & cheese, even in a smoothie! Whether it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner,  you can always add some roasted squash!

 

How to prepare and roast squash:

1.       Peel squash and cut into similarly-sized pieces for generally even roasting. Cutting the squash will help it cook more quickly & evenly than roasting it whole

2.       Lay out quash pieces on a large baking sheet. Drizzle oil over the squash and sprinkle salt evenly across the pieces, then mix up so that the pieces are evenly coated. Evenly coating the squash in oil will help it cook evenly – and the fat will help your body absorb the vitamins and minerals in the squash!

3.       Roast at about 400-425 for about 20-30 minutes (lower heat = longer time) Generally, cooking at a higher temperature will cook the outside quicker, giving more of a crust/crunch – but the risk is that you might burn the outside. Cooking at a lower temperature for longer will lend to more evenly tender pieces of squash. There is not a right or wrong way to do it – over time, you’ll learn your preference! (It also depends how much time you have to put dinner on the table!)

4.       When the squash is done, remove the pan and let it cool.


Q & A Notes:

  • For roasting squash- do you roast in cubes, or do you roast bigger pieces then cube?

  • For pureeing, bigger pieces is better because less surface is getting dried out. For roasting, bite-sizes are fine, especially with dressing added later

 


Breaking Down a Whole Chicken

Tips:

  • Buying whole chicken will get you a much better value of $/pound. Plus, you can make stock with the bones after!

  • Defrost for about 2 days in the fridge, or, put your plastic-wrapped chicken in hot water in your sink or a large bowl for 2-3 hours (or the day if you’re gone for work).

  • Once defrosted, you can break down your chicken or you can roast your chicken whole. Be sure to check for a neck, liver, and heart. If you plan to make chicken stock with the leftover bones, keep the neck to add to the stock. The liver and heart can be sautéed and blended for pate.

  • A smaller boning knife can be helpful, but your best sharp knife will work well, too.

  • We separated the larger pieces for separate meals (which you can re-freeze for later). For the salad, we used the shredded chicken pulled from the body of the chicken.

How To:

WINGS:

  • Start at natural separation between wings and body, make a cut in the skin. Then you can bend back the wing to pop the join, and then use your knife to remove the wing. Repeat on the other side.

  • You will have 2 wings.

LEGS:

  • Again, look for the natural separation between the body and the leg. Separate the skin first, to find the line, then cut down along the line/space (you don’t need a lot of pressure). Once you cut through the joint, you will also need to cut through the thigh meat to remove the leg from the body.

  • Remember that it’s OK to feel around and take your time, especially if you haven’t butchered many chickens! Repeat on the other side. For legs/thighs, it’s best to leave the meat on the bone (rather than try to remove the bone from the middle)

  • You have the option to separate the thigh (upper leg) from the drumstick (lower leg) if you want to. The parts would cook a little bit more quickly this way, and you will have smaller portions of meat for use in different recipes. For frying, we’d recommend smaller pieces, but for roasting or pan cooking, you can keep the leg whole.

  • You will have 2 legs, or, 2 thighs + 2 drumsticks (as pictured below)

BREAST:

  • Holding the body upside-down, with the cavity facing upward, slice off the back bone from the breast bone. You will need to bend the back, then cut it off. You can save the back for stock. You can cook the back before you add it to stock, but it’s not necessary to cook it.

  • Lay the chicken down on the cutting board. With the breast meat facing upward, press down to flatten slightly. Separate the skin, and then cut meat off the bone beneath it, staying as close to the bone as you can. You will cut off the chicken breast and the chicken tender under that. Repeat on the other side.

  • You will have 2 boneless chicken breasts.

ROASTING:

  • Organize chicken on pan based on how fast parts cook- breasts are the fastest, then wings, then legs/thighs. Cooking bone-in will mean longer cooking time, but the benefit is added flavor and moisture.

  • Add oil, salt, and cook at 375F,

  • Use a meat thermometer to check temperatures, and take parts out when they reach 165F (25 - 45 minutes)

 Making Chicken Stock

Tips:

  • You can extract fat, collagen, and tons of flavor from the leftover bones and meat of poultry.

  • Store vegetable scraps, chicken bones and parts like necks, hearts, and backs, in a container in your freezer to make a big batch of stock when you have time.

  • It’s highly recommended that you only make broth/stock from poultry that you can trust. The nutrients in a small-scale, pasture-raised, non-gmo-fed or organically-fed chicken – like the chickens from Maple Wind Farm -  are going to be much higher quality and safer. Furthermore, conventionally-raised chickens can have pesticide residue in their meat & bones from the poor quality of their die

Where to use homemade stock:

Homemade stock is great for the base of a soup, such as chicken noodle soup because of the great flavor and to highlight your hard work, but we also love to use stock for cooking grains and for adding to blended soups!

How to:

  1. Simply add vegetable cuttings (carrots, onions, herbs) and chicken bones to a large pot and cover with cold water (don’t need to add salt). Add a splash of apple cider vinegar to help dissolve the minerals in the bones.

  2. Bring to a boil, then cook on low heat to simmer for 6-12 hours. This is a good weekend or evening project. You can expect better results with stovetop, but a slow cooker for the low-heat portion (after boiling) will work as well.

  3. Skim off cloudy bubbles at the top occasionally.

  4. Cool it to a temperature that’s safe to handle, then you can strain out the scraps with a mesh sieve or cheesecloth.

  5. Then, transfer to plastic bags or Tupperware to store in the fridge (for use within 6 days) or freezer. (It’s hard not to make a mess but it’s worth it!)  (Be sure to leave room for liquid to expand if you’re storing in the freezer.

 


Browned Butter & Reduced Cider Dressing

Reduced Apple Cider Syrup

Where to use reduced cider:

Add to ice cream or pancakes, beverages or cocktails, in salad dressing, or add to meat, marinades, or to braised meat. Starting with at least ½ gallon of cider, add to a pot and simmer over medium heat.

Tips:

You’re evaporating water from the cider, and condensing the flavor and sweetness. The longer it cooks, the thicker your apple cider syrup/reduction will be. Aim for the consistency of maple syrup.

You can add sage or rosemary to your syrup too!

How to:

Pour apple cider into a sauce pot. Bring to a boil, then simmer and reduce to desired thickness.

Browned Butter

Tips:

We used Ploughgate Creamery Cultured Butter

How to:

1.       Put butter in pan and simmer it, medium-medium low

2.       Butter will simmer and break down, then clear fat will separate  (ghee) and milk solids (whey, casein, lactose). Leave everything in the pan and stir often.

3.       Milk solids get stuck to bottom of pan and brown and flavor changes

4.       If you keep heat lower, it’ll still brown it’ll just take longer

 

Dressing

The Essential Make-at-Home Dressing Ratio:

  • 1 cup fat (we used ¾ c browned butter and ¼ c olive oil

  • 1/3 c acid (vinegar and/or citrus

  • 1/3 c cider syrup

  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard

  • 1/2 finely chopped shallot

  • pinch of salt

Add all ingredients to a food process or blender and blend to combine. Store in a glass jar or tupperware.