5/14/18

Seared Steak with Sautéed Mushrooms & a Pan Sauce

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Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Main Dish | Diet: Omnivore

This recipe is made by combining three of our other recipes: seared steak, sautéed mushrooms, and pan sauce

All you've got to do is follow those recipes, pile the mushrooms atop the meat, and pour the sauce over, and you've got a delicious main course. 

Seared Steak

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Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Main Dish | Diet: Omnivore

A basic recipe for a slab of meat! 

  • a steak, pork chop, chicken leg, or what have you
  • salt
  • pepper
  • oil
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Remove the meat from its package, and using paper towels or a clean kitchen towel, pat it dry. 
  3. Liberally season both sides of the meat with salt and pepper. 
  4. Heat a large, heavy bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat. If you have a kitchen fan, turn it on. 
  5. When the pan is hot, add the oil. When the oil shimmers, gently place the meat in the pan. If you have more than one piece, arrange them so they're not touching. Try not to move the meat around once you've put it down.
  6. Cook until the meat is seared on the first side. When it is, you will find that it will easily release itself from the pan. 
  7. Flip the meat, turn off the burner, and place the pan in the oven.
  8. The cooking time will depend on the size of the steak/chop/leg, and how well done you wish it to be. You can use a thermometer to "temp" the meat, if you'd like. 
  9. When the meat is done, remove it from the pan, and let it rest. You can now deglaze the pan and make a sauce, if you wish. 

Sautéed Mushrooms

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Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type:  Side | Diet: Vegetarian/Vegan/GF

Sautéed mushrooms are incredibly versatile. They can be used in omelettes, as a topping on burgers, to garnish salads or vegetable dishes, atop seared meats, or simply eaten as a side dish.

  • mushrooms
  • butter or olive oil
  • salt
  • pepper
  1. Rinse the mushrooms, pull out the stems and save them for stock (I keep a "stockpile" in my freezer, in which I save bones and veggie scraps. When I have enough, I make a batch). Slice the mushroom caps. 
  2. Heat the fat in a large saucepan, and when hot, add the mushrooms, and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are tender, and slightly browned. 
  3. Use in whatever way suits your fancy. 

Pan Sauce for Steak, Pork Chops or Chicken

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Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment - Sauce | Diet: Omnivore

If you keep stock in your freezer, you can make a pan sauce at a moment's notice. It's a quick way to add incredible flavor to simple food.

  • A pan in which you've just cooked something flavorful, such as mushrooms, caramelized onions, or seared meat.
  • stock (meat stock works best, because it includes gelatin and collagen) 
  • butter
  • salt
  • pepper
  • an acidic ingredient, such as vinegar or lemon juice
  • any other spices or herbs you desire
  1. While the pan is still hot, pour in a couple cups of stock (or more, depending on how much sauce you wish to make).
  2. Simmer the sauce and let it reduce until it thickens and has the consistency of a glaze.
  3. Turn off the pan, add a couple tablespoons of butter, and whisk until the butter is incorporated. This is called "mounting the sauce." When the butter has melted and been whisked in, the sauce will be nice and glossy, and thick.
  4. Taste the sauce, and season. It's great to use acidity and salt to balance out the flavors, and make them sing. Add a little bit at a time, tasting after each addition, until the sauce is glorious. 
  5. Serve over whatever you'd originally cooked in the pan, or anything that would be more delicious with sauce than without it.

 

Roasted Potatoes with Chimichurri

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Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Average | Season: All | Type: Starchy Side | Diet: Vegetarian/Vegan/GF

This is a super simple recipe that yields a very flavorful result. Just toss together roasted potatoes with chimichurri (either homemade, or from our Omnivore Package), and serve.

  • red potatoes
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • pepper
  • chimichurri
  1. Preheat the oven to 425-degrees.
  2. Wash the potatoes, and cut into similar-sized pieces. (I often cut them potatoes into 16ths when I'm roasting them, but it all depends on the 'tater. Uniformity is more important than size).
  3. If you have parchment paper*, place some on your baking sheet. If not, you can do without. 
  4. Put the potatoes on the baking sheet, and toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper. The potato pieces should be nicely coated with oil.
  5. Bake, stirring every 15 minutes, until potatoes are tender. Remove from oven, and immediately toss with chimichurri (seasoning the potatoes when their hot helps the flavor to penetrate). Serve hot, or at room temperature. 

*parchment paper is an incredible boon in the kitchen. It prevents food from sticking, which can be wasteful, and makes cleanup easier. If parchment isn't oil soaked, it can be reused. 

Mesclun Salad with European Cucumber & Sunflower Vinaigrette

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Recipe Level: Creative | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: Summer | Type: Salad | Diet: Vegan/Vegetarian/GF/DF

I love putting edible flowers on salads. In spring, this might mean adding a handful of violets, or sprinkling on dandelion petals. In summer, borage and nasturtium are favorites. They never fail to make people smile. 

Like many recipes, this one is flexible. Pick as bowl that will hold the amount of salad you think you need to feed the number of people you're feeding, and fill it up with ingredients. Let people dress their own at the table, so the greens don't wilt. 

  • baby lettuce, mesclun mix, or head lettuce
  • cucumber
  • sunflower shoots
  • edible flowers, if desired
  • sunflower vinaigrette
  1. Wash the greens, dry them in a salad spinner, and tear them into bite-sized pieces
  2. Rinse the cucumber, and cut off the amount you wish to use, slice it in half lengthwise, and cut into half moons.
  3. Rinse the sunflower shoots, and dry them. 
  4. Place the salad greens in a bowl, top with cucumbers and sunflower shoots, and place the edible flowers on top.
  5. Serve with the dressing on the side. 
  6. Make sure you have salt on the table, as salad can often use an extra sprinkle* 

*fun fact: "salad" means "salted." The Romans seasoned their greens with brine, or with a salted oil and vinegar mixture, and the name stuck. 

Sunflower Vinaigrette

Recipe Level: Basic | Recipe Speed: Quick | Season: All | Type: Condiment | Diet: Vegan/Vegetarian/GF/DF

This salad dressing is nutty, with a hint of garlic. It's a great match for baby lettuce, cheddar cheese, cucumbers, and apples. 

  • 1 cup oil (I like to use 2/3 cup sunflower oil and 1 cup olive oil)
  • 1/3 cup of cider or white wine vinegar, or lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup toasted sunflower seeds
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons mustard
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • a few grinds of fresh pepper
  1. This recipe is best made in a food processor or blender, because you're mixing in toasted sunflower seeds. All you need to do is combine the ingredients and blend until uniform. 
  2. Taste the dressing, and see if you like the level of seasoning. Add more salt, or pepper, or mustard, or garlic, as desired.